قالب وردپرس درنا توس
Home / Business / BBC – Capital – Jobs where liars shine

BBC – Capital – Jobs where liars shine



I have a confession: I am lying. A lot of. I lie to interrupt or begin conversations to save the feelings of others or my own and to simplify social or professional life in a millionfold ways.

To some extent, we know that the people we work with are lying to us. You can not always have a nice day, enjoy the work or look forward to a colleague who has been promoted.

But what if deception is not just about mood, but is burned into content? a job? New research suggests that one of the reasons people lied about certain professions is that people with flexible attitudes to the truth in these jobs are actually better off.

Attitudes towards liars in the workplace

Deception in general the workplace is rated negative ̵

1; if someone has to fall back on lies, he probably is not very good at his job. And fraud can be harmful to a culture of trust and teamwork. However, according to recent studies by US scientists Brian C Gunia and Emma E Levine, there is an exception for occupations that are perceived as more sales-driven than customer-oriented.

In the marketing study, customer focus is all about satisfaction Customer needs, while sales orientation refers to achieving the seller's own goals. Certain professions, such as sales and investment banking, are stereotyped as orientation-biased (although in practice, of course, sellers can be very caring and caregivers can interest themselves).

Lying Is Natural to a Certain Extent

Researchers Gunia and Levine asked their study participants, including over 500 business students and survey respondents on Amazon Mechanical Turk's crowdsourced website in the US, to rate specific jobs according to their perceived sales orientation and hypothetical individuals to evaluate their perceived competence. Participants were given scenarios such as the following: When filing the costs, "Julie" claims that a taxi ride cost more than it actually cost; "James" pretends to enjoy sailing, to join a sailor-keeper.

At the end of the day, respondents believed that people who had been deceived would be more successful in high-sales jobs, and put them first. For example, 84% of the participants chose to hire scammers for a high-selling task, while 75% hired honest people for a low-sales task.

People believe that persons who can regulate their emotions are more competent than those who can not – Levine

The results are interesting, but not final. (On the one hand, research participants paid very little, and survey markets such as Mechanical Turk are controversial because they pay low rates and alleged exploitation.)

It is also uncertain how respondents 'beliefs affect recruitment managers' actions. There is mixed evidence as to whether customer focus or sales orientation is more effective in practice, though customer focus seems to be the advantage in terms of closing the deal.

The recent study of the relationship between perceived deception and perceived competence states that "recruited business students should be confident that the stereotypes we survey are actually being held by future practitioners," Levine of the Booth School explains of Business at the University of Chicago. Students who aspire to leadership may actually believe that deception signals competence in these occupations and allows those beliefs to be incorporated into future hiring practices. "

Is there an advantage in lying at work?

Lying is natural, to some extent. "Nature is full of deceit," writes philosopher David Livingstone Smith at the beginning of his book, "Why We Lies: The Evolutionary Roots of Deception and the Unconscious." Viruses deceive the immune system of their hosts, while chameleons use camouflage to deceive predators. And people are no exception, even in the workplace. Hiring managers recognize that almost all applicants exaggerate their qualifications.

In certain occupations a deception is absolutely necessary (this can be witnessed by undercover investigators). And diplomacy is synonymous with lies for some people. Deception can even be strategic throughout the organization, such as For example, if a call center instructs employees to stay in another country due to customer prejudice.

More generally, the definition of workplace deception can be blurry. The role of customer service, and in particular the type of emotional work that is often done by women, usually requires workers to mask their feelings. Do you really want a flight attendant, bartender or psychiatrist to tell you that you should worry about the turmoil, that they despise you or that they are apathetic when they treat you?

Certain jobs require a performance of affability or care that requires this by nature to be partially artificial (and stressful). As Levine says, "people believe that people who can regulate their emotions are more competent than those who can not." Emotional misrepresentation is rational behavior.

This is particularly true for social media influencers, who blur the line between authenticity and the selling spirit. For example, Instagram stars who stage lavish "surprise engagements", although this can backfire when the illusion is destroyed.

Sweet Little Lies

Sometimes benevolent lies are even considered a more ethical option. "In the course of my research, I find that many people appreciate and appreciate lies that are useful to them," commented Levine. For example, "employees believe that their colleagues should protect them from feedback that they can not put into action and that only serve to hurt their feelings, and oncology patients value false hopes more than their oncologists recognize."

What is it? Key to the pro-social lie? or the kind of dishonesty that should help others is that it's not about gaining an unfair advantage or otherwise serving yourself. It's about bringing little white lies out of custody.

Many people greet and appreciate lies that should benefit them – Levine

This type of attitude may have a cultural impact, as some research suggests to people from collectivist cultures are more likely to lie to save the face and the To protect harmony in the group. A study co-authored by Michele Gelfand, a psychologist at the University of Maryland, brought more than 1,500 students from eight countries into a business negotiation scenario that would be helpful in lying. Those from the more collectivist countries (such as South Korea and Greece) have used more deception than those from the more individualist countries (such as Australia and Germany), although the total lie was high.

The box can sometimes refer to bending the rules, "commented Gelfand. Some research points to a connection between creativity and dishonesty, as it is easier for people working in creative fields to rationalize fraud.

Tolerance (or even encouragement) of workplace illusions can be hard to pin down. Long Wang, a senior management professor at City University in Hong Kong, points out that "organizational or industrial standards are often treated in favor of deception as a sort of secret, at least to the public." However, he doubts that such organizational or industry standards are sustainable and says, "They could be wiped out in the long run."

Light illusion is not always poisonous. But in general, jobs are more effective when people feel empowered to rely on the truth. Some prominent politicians are good examples of the massively harmful and divisive consequences that lying in the workplace can have.

Do all the little lies that I tell make me feel better in my workplace? Probably not. But I do not have to argue too much about her. As Levine says, "It is very important to us whether others have good intentions with us, but it is not always important to us whether others speak the truth."

To comment on this story or something else, what You've Seen At BBC Capital, please visit our Facebook Page or send us a message at Twitter .

If you liked this story, sign up for the Weekly Newsletter titled "If You Read Only 6 Things This Week". A handpicked selection of BBC Future, Culture, Capital and Travel stories delivered to your inbox every Friday.


Source link