Home / Health / Dallas County reports COVID-19 ER visits, 10 deaths and 1,201 new cases Thursday – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Dallas County reports COVID-19 ER visits, 10 deaths and 1,201 new cases Thursday – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth



For the second day in a row, Dallas County reports an increase in COVID-19 emergency rooms on Thursday, as well as 10 more deaths and 1,201 newly confirmed cases of infection.

Dallas County officials said in a statement on Thursday afternoon that “visits to the emergency room for COVID-19-like symptoms in Dallas County had increased to 824 in the 24-hour period ending Wednesday night.” the county’s 786 emergency rooms within the 24 hours The county added that 831 people are currently treated in acute care for COVID-19 infections, 60 more than on Wednesday.

“It will get worse before it gets better, and it is up to all of us to wear our masks when we are near people outside of our own home,”

; said Clay Jenkins, a judge in Dallas County, in a statement on Thursday. “With the spread in the community, you are much more likely to come into contact with infected people than you were when we were ordered to protect.”

Jenkins urged people to carry masks with them if they unexpectedly land near people, and to avoid eating in restaurants and in gyms, day camps, amusement arcades, cinemas, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert halls, sports arenas, youth sports, to go. public swimming pools, weddings or other major events.

“This is an extremely critical time in our fight against COVID-19. We expect more cases to appear in the coming days and how much this increase will depend on each of us doing our part,” said Jenkins on Wednesday.

Ten people between the ages of 50 and 90 are among the youngest North Texans to die from the virus. This includes:

  • A Garland man in his fifties with health problems who lived in a long-term care facility died after a serious illness in a local hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her sixties who had health problems and was hospitalized.
  • A Dallas man in his sixties who had health problems and was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • An Irving man in his sixties with underlying health problems who was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • A woman from Sunnyvale in her sixties who had health problems and was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her seventies who had health problems and was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • A Garland man in his seventies who had health problems and was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her seventies who had health problems and died in a hospital emergency room.
  • A Dallas man in his seventies who had health problems and was seriously ill in a local hospital.
  • A Dallas man in his nineties who had health problems and died in the long-term care facility where he lived.

The 1,201 cases reported on Thursday are the seventh day in a row with more than 1,000 cases. The 7-day average for new cases is now 1,110 cases per day, compared to an average of 209 per day on June 1. Last week, Dallas County added 7,771 new cases of the virus.

Since the tests began in March, the county has now collected more than 30,300 cases of the virus. In the county, 436 deaths were attributed to the virus, which Dr. Philip Huang, director of health and human services in Dallas, is the third leading cause of death in the county after heart disease and cancer.

The increase in cases is due to the fact that the state’s positivity rate, the percentage of people who tested positive for the virus, has been well above 10% for more than two weeks and rose to just over 15% on Wednesday. An increase in the positivity rate indicates an increase in the spread of the virus, not an increase in the tests for the virus.

According to the Texas Department of Health, an estimated 16,192 people (through Thursday) in the county have recovered from the virus, leaving an estimated 13,733 known patients fighting the infection.

District officials said last week that more than half of the newly reported cases were young adults between the ages of 18 and 39.

To date, 83% of cases where hospitalization has been required and employment has been reported have been critical infrastructure workers with a wide range of occupations affected, including health care, transport, nutrition and agriculture, public works, finance, communication, clergymen, first aid workers and others important functions.

Of the cases where hospitalization is required, two thirds were younger than 65 and about half do not suffer from high-risk chronic illnesses. Diabetes is an underlying high-risk health condition that has been reported in approximately one third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The county has reported for several weeks that more than a third of COVID-19-related deaths have occurred in residents of long-term care facilities.




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