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Do not email this DNA kit until you know these facts




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With each passing day, technology is getting closer and closer to a reality where we can not just test our family history with followers of 23andMe, Ancenstry.com. MyHeritage or Helix, but also our predisposition to the disease: A simple finger stroke or cheek swab can tell us what could happen if the right combination of factors in our lives has an impact, but the risks and results of such tests are not always what it seems in fact, there is a lot of genetic testing that most people do not know about.

As we feel more comfortable with home DNA testing kits, and allow companies to assess our biologics, the market continues to change Way, including the types of diseases and diseases that can be tested, how accurate the tests are and how much information is common and this should affect us Number of reasons that range from blata Data privacy concerns due to subtle discrimination by insurance companies due to emotional distress due to unexpected outcomes (23Measured in the Experienced holidays) and misunderstood results.

Businesswoman on blurred background holding hand dna and molecular structure

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Before you email in this DNA sample, here are 10 very important things that you ( and your family ) should take into account.

. 1 Results are not a diagnosis. What the results provide is your risk – or the likelihood and impact of a disease or disorder. Consult a physician before taking the results too seriously or making ill-informed decisions due to insufficient information.

. 2 Currently available tests are not as advanced – or accurate – as they are often claimed, and do not show what patients want. While genetic testing is currently capable of detecting thousands of diseases and disorders, FDA in-house tests are limited to about 10 diseases and conditions.

. 3 Tests that are marketed directly to consumers may be prone to false positives, suggesting that a person has something, although in reality this is not the case. Results can also produce false negatives, suggesting that a person has something, even though they actually do.

. 4 Biomarkers and genetic tests for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases do not cause the same family stress and concern for families such as neurological and degenerative diseases such as dementia. And despite media hype and conspicuous press releases, there is currently no single test or tool that can accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease or predict with 100% certainty who will develop it – or any of the similar neurodegenerative diseases.

. 5 We know that smoking and obesity kill millions of Americans each year, and these behaviors continue. Therefore, many believe that few will change their personal behavior due to DNA test results. However, insights associated with personal choices and belief systems could change the way individuals, families and communities prepare for illness. But behavior will certainly change as insurance companies, care providers and employers provide and pay for results-based care.

. 6 Currently, long-term care insurance, disability insurance and life insurance can block coverage if your genetic tests are prone to diseases and disorders. The societal implications of such discrimination could severely determine who receives and does not receive care solely because of the profile risk.

. 7 The Congress took an important step towards protecting patient data for genetic testing by adopting the GET (Getic Information Nondiscrimination Act 2008), which prevents an employer or health insurance from discriminating against Americans on the basis of genetic information.

. 8 You should have big concerns about your privacy. Since 2017, when 23andMe partnered with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the world knows that genetic testing companies and pharmaceutical companies are interconnected. In this particular case, 23andMe made a $ 300 million investment, and GSK, along with six other pharmaceutical companies, received 23andMe agreements that accorded patient behavior, health and genetic information.

. 9 The obvious target of Gentest companies partnering with Pharma is research and development of medicines as well as targeting individuals. However, as many do not know that their spit samples or blood test results will be sold to third parties for large sums and targeting, data protection issues will certainly become more important in the coming years as disease awareness becomes more accurate and serious. [19659006] 10. We will need many more genetic counselors to help with the new insights and care plans. Without remedies or highly effective symptomatic treatments associated with genetic testing, the risk and reward of outcomes will certainly be detrimental to individuals, families, health markets and communities.

Maybe ignorance is bliss. However, if you disagree and would like to participate in a genetic or genealogical examination, here is some additional information and advice from the Mayo Clinic that could help you and your family through the process.

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With each passing day, technology is getting closer and closer to a reality where we can not only test our family ancestors with 23andMe, Ancenstry.com, MyHeritage or Helix, but also our disease propensity. A simple finger or cheek swab can tell us what could happen if the right combination of factors in our lives has an effect. However, the risks and results of such tests are not always as they seem. In fact, there are a lot of genetic tests that most people do not know about.

As we feel more comfortable with home DNA testing kits and allow companies to assess our biological composition, the market is changing more and more. These include the types of diseases and diseases that can be tested, how accurate the tests are and how much information is shared. This may include selling your information to third parties. And this should affect us for a number of reasons, ranging from obvious privacy concerns, to subtle discrimination by insurance companies, to emotional stress from unexpected outcomes (23 and mo) during vacations and misunderstood outcomes.

Businesswoman on blurred background holding hand DNA and molecular structure

Getty

So before you email in this DNA sample, here are 10 very important things that you ( and your family) in Should consider.

. 1 Results are not a diagnosis. What the results provide is your risk – or the likelihood and impact of a disease or disorder. Consult a physician before taking the results too seriously or making ill-informed decisions due to insufficient information.

. 2 Currently available tests are not as advanced – or accurate – as they are often claimed, and do not show what patients want. While genetic testing is currently capable of detecting thousands of diseases and disorders, FDA in-house tests are limited to about 10 diseases and conditions.

. 3 Tests that are marketed directly to consumers may be prone to false positives, suggesting that a person has something, although in reality this is not the case. Results can also produce false negatives, suggesting that a person has something, even though they actually do.

. 4 Biomarkers and genetic tests for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases do not cause the same family stress and concern for families such as neurological and degenerative diseases such as dementia. And despite media hype and conspicuous press releases, there is currently no single test or tool that can accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease or predict with 100% certainty who will develop it – or any of the similar neurodegenerative diseases.

. 5 We know that smoking and obesity kill millions of Americans each year, and these behaviors continue. Therefore, many believe that few will change their personal behavior due to DNA test results. However, insights associated with personal choices and belief systems could change the way individuals, families and communities prepare for illness. But behavior will certainly change as insurance companies, care providers and employers provide and pay for results-based care.

. 6 Currently, long-term care insurance, disability insurance and life insurance can block coverage if your genetic tests are prone to diseases and disorders. The societal implications of such discrimination could severely determine who receives and does not receive care solely because of the profile risk.

. 7 The Congress took an important step towards protecting patient data for genetic testing by adopting the GET (Getic Information Nondiscrimination Act 2008), which prevents an employer or health insurance from discriminating against Americans on the basis of genetic information.

. 8 You should have big concerns about your privacy. Since 2017, when 23andMe partnered with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the world knows that genetic testing companies and pharmaceutical companies are interconnected. In this particular case, 23andMe made a $ 300 million investment, and GSK, along with six other pharmaceutical companies, received 23andMe agreements that accorded patient behavior, health and genetic information.

. 9 The obvious target of Gentest companies partnering with Pharma is research and development of medicines as well as targeting individuals. However, as many do not know that their spit samples or blood test results will be sold to third parties for large sums and targeting, data protection issues will certainly become more important in the coming years as disease awareness becomes more accurate and serious. [19659006] 10. We will need many more genetic counselors to help with the new insights and care plans. Without remedies or highly effective symptomatic treatments associated with genetic testing, the risk and reward of outcomes will certainly be detrimental to individuals, families, health markets and communities.

Maybe ignorance is bliss. However, if you disagree and would like to participate in a genetic or genealogical examination, here is some additional information and advice from the Mayo Clinic that could help you and your family through the process.


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