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Elon Musk weeps over his tears




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CHICAGO, IL – JUNE 14: Engineer and technology entrepreneur Elon Musk of The Boring Company listens to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's decision to build a high-speed Transit Tunnels in Block Talks During a press conference on June 1

4, 2018 in Chicago, Ill., Musk said he could take a 16-passenger vehicle for a high-speed rail system that will accommodate travelers to and from Chicago and O'Hare International Airport could be twenty minutes, with speeds of over 100 miles per hour. (Photo by Joshua Lott / Getty Images)

Elon Musk does not want the world to think he was crying, but what's wrong with screaming? [19659003] Last week, I wrote about Musk's infamous interview with The New York Times in which he reportedly shed tears over the emotional price of entrepreneurship David Gelles wrote the article and shared it in a separate

Times Insider piece that said The Talk with Musk was "one of the most extraordinary interviews of the [his] career" because he had never seen a leader , "I've been applauding and putting myself in Musk's story – and his tears – female executives can not cry – we have clear double standards and can not show up like men at work, like Musk

About a week after the first one Times articles speculated about Musk's emotional state around the world – we saw comments from celebrities and world-famous journalists, but Musk himself remained silent until yesterday morning – Berlin-based founder Tijen Onaran had retweeted my play and shared my feelings about the difficulties women face at work, perhaps sparked by the title of my Forbes play, "A Female Founder Tears the Tears of Elon Musk," Musk broke his silence and simply stated: "Remember, my voice broke once during the NY Times article. That's it. There were no tears. "

I wrote the article because I respect the honesty and openness shown by Musk The New York Times and I applaud its transparency and vulnerability." Starting a company is tough. Musk is a visionary, he's doing great things, he wants to change the world, and as far as I understand, he's doing it by his side without the help of a leadership team.

There's a double standard that women in the world have Faced with leadership on a daily basis, women at America's workplaces must overcome an almost inextricable limit to being authentic, without being vulnerable, projecting a strong image without being aggressive, and finding a way to be kind, but not meek We certainly can not cry, I could not tell you how many times I felt the dreaded throttle in my throat at work, each time I remember Tom Hanks in his Team in A League of Their Own shouted, "There is no crying in baseball." For women, this feeling remains very true.

Musk had options with his response to the media movement and my article. He could have been silent or he could have accepted that moment as part of a much larger conversation. He could have answered, "Yes, I cried," and gave reasons why a sensible adult could be emotional in the face of the stress of running a successful business. (And why not?) We all watched him 60 Minutes .)

But Musk decided to tell his millions of followers that he was not as emotional as The New York Times reports. Is crying really that bad? In recent years, I have read dozens of articles in which Musk shouts at his employees, yelling at journalists, calling a recent critic a slander, and countless other cases of aggression. I've also heard stories of other male executives that Jeff Bezos and Steve Jobs come to mind, slandering insults and losing control. And while I have never heard or read Musk, Bezos or Jobs denying these actions, it underlines the fact that when a male manager acts aggressively, it is accepted as part of his leadership style. It only comes with the package. Crying and anger are very similar; they are both expressions of emotion, or if they are viewed in a different way, they both reflect the loss of control over emotion. Is it that we glorify one – anger – and condemn the other because it is considered female?

I do not know the answer, but I think it pays to ask the question: If we can not show our true emotional self the workplace and the companies we run, how can we possibly be successful? Women can not cry because we are considered weak. We can not scream because we hear the whispers about our sharp elbows or are called a bitch. How can we possibly survive this tightrope walk?

I would like to know why Musk waded into the conversation just to deny his tears. I suppose the best way to find out is to tweet it today. CHICAGO, IL – JUNE 14: Engineer and tech entrepreneur Elon Musk of The Boring Company listens as Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel talks about building a high-speed transport tunnel at Block 37 during a news conference on June 14.

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2018 in Chicago, Ill. Musk said he could create a 16-passenger vehicle to work on a high-speed rail system that could get travelers to and from the downtown Chicago and O. Hare International Airport under twenty minutes, at speeds of over 100 miles per hour. (Photo by Joshua Lott / Getty Images)

Elon Musk does not want the world to think he was crying, but what's wrong with crying? [19659003] Last week I wrote about Musk's infamous interview with The New York Times in which he reports tears over the emotional price of entrepreneurship, David Gelle He wrote the article and told him in a separate Times Insider piece that his conversation with Musk was "one of the most extraordinary interviews of the [his] career" because he had never seen a leader, "one said Vulnerability. "I applauded and received Musk's story – and his tears – but shared my conclusion that female leaders can not cry. We are faced with a clear double standard and can not appear like men at work; How Musk

Over a week after the first Times article, media around the world speculated about Musk's emotional state. We saw comments from celebrities and world-famous journalists, but Musk himself remained silent. Until yesterday morning. Berlin-based founder Tijen Onaran retweeted my play and shared my feelings about the difficulties women face at work. Perhaps sparked by the title of my Forbes play, "A Female Founder Tears the Tears of Elon Musk," Musk broke his silence and simply stated: "Remember, my voice broke once during the NY Times article There were no tears. "

I wrote the article because I respect the honesty and candor that Musk has shown The New York Times and I applaud his transparency and vulnerability. Starting a company is tough. Musk is a visionary. He does big things. He wants to change the world. And as far as I understand, he does it without the help of a leadership team at his side.

There is a double standard that women in leadership face every day. Women at America's workplaces must overcome an almost inextricable limit to being authentic, without being vulnerable, projecting a strong image without being aggressive, and finding a way to be kind, but not meek. Above all, we certainly can not cry. I could not tell you how many times I felt the dreaded throttle in my throat at work. Each time I remember Tom Hanks, who in his team in A League of Its Own shouted, "There is no crying in baseball." For women, this feeling remains very true.

Musk had options with his response to the media movement and my article. He could have been silent or he could have accepted that moment as part of a much larger conversation. He could have answered, "Yes, I cried," and gave reasons why a sensible adult could be emotional in the face of the stress of running a successful business. (And why not?) We all watched him 60 Minutes .)

But Musk decided to tell his millions of followers that he was not as emotional as The New York Times reports. Is crying really that bad? In recent years, I have read dozens of articles in which Musk shouts at his employees, yelling at journalists, calling a recent critic a slander, and countless other cases of aggression. I've also heard stories of other male executives that Jeff Bezos and Steve Jobs come to mind, slandering insults and losing control. And while I have never heard or read Musk, Bezos or Jobs denying these actions, it underlines the fact that when a male manager acts aggressively, it is accepted as part of his leadership style. It only comes with the package. Crying and anger are very similar; they are both expressions of emotion, or if they are viewed in a different way, they both reflect the loss of control over emotion. Is it that we glorify one – anger – and condemn the other because it is considered female?

I do not know the answer, but I think it pays to ask the question: If we can not show our true emotional self the workplace and the companies we run, how can we possibly be successful? Women can not cry because we are considered weak. We can not scream because we hear the whispers about our sharp elbows or are called a bitch. How can we possibly survive this tightrope walk?

I would like to know why Musk waded into the conversation just to deny his tears. I suppose the best way to find out is to tweet it today.


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