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Flight delayed due to a "Technology Issue"? Better getting used to




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If you had a Delta Air Lines ticket last week, your flight may have been delayed by a few hours, you should get used to it" technology issue " becomes the new normal for air travelers. [196591001] Passengers vented in the social media.

Earlier this year I noted in my column "Washington Post" that it is not a question of "if", but in another IT disaster technology-related failures in domestic airlines have been in the last z hhn number will be 11 in 2015.

I hate it, if I'm right.

IT issues seem to be growing. And while the causes are complex, the emergency plan is as simple as ever. If an airline cancels your flight and blames the technology, you can not accept it with a shrug.

Technology "problems" get worse

A study conducted by Qualtrics on behalf of Sungard AS, a global IT services company. noted that only a single failure can drive out a significant number of customers. More than a third of passengers (34 percent) said they would not book a ticket for an airline with a technological downtime, according to Sungard AS

It's a worldwide problem. For example, earlier this month, Pakistan International Airlines reportedly postponed its flights after the entire booking system "went under." It turned out that the carrier switched to a new Turkish web-based product with the aptly named "HITIT". In August, Spirit Airlines experienced a system-wide service interruption that prevented check-in of passengers. And in June, American Airlines suffered a service outage after a "serious" computer problem. More about this in a minute.

Delta's IT problem remains a mystery. At 8:28 pm, the airline announced that its IT teams are "working diligently" to solve a technology problem affecting some of their systems. "We made a delta stop to get the systems up again as soon as possible," the airline said. "There was no disruption or security problem with a delta flight currently in the air." At 9:20 pm, Delta announced that it had restored all IT systems and announced a "technological problem" to the flight delays. briefly affected some systems.

And it apologized.

What Causes These Technological Disruptions?

"Although the cause of each occurrence varies, IT issues in the travel industry can be attributed to several overarching factors," says Michael Levine Schellman & Company, a senior associate (19659001), does not like to spend a lot of money on technology, so their systems are antiquated before they get overdue upgrades, experts say.

"The complex nature between many systems – reservations, Flight planning, workforce scheduling, etc. – can lead to breaks in the chain, "says Levine." Airlines often work with regional offices, which means they are affected by their IT infrastructure and outages. "

Exactly June with American Airlines PSA Airlines, a regional subsidiary of American, had a hardware problem with one their personnel planning systems. "It seems that there was no real backup system, so the outage lasted much longer than necessary," says Levine.

It's not just technology. The major airlines have invested heavily in redundant systems across multiple networks, says Brian Gill, CEO of Gillware Data Recovery. They have "unbelievably redundant" storage arrays in which the transactional databases perform all operations and data is backed up in near real time across multiple sites and private clouds. [196591001] "The weak link in the chain," he explains "people."

Employees and contractors are not adequately trained to monitor the system or fend off cybercrime.

"It only takes one person to do something unbelievably ignorant or stupid," says Gill. The bugs range from a programmer processing data insecurely or a marketing manager who uploads customer data to an insecure third-party app.

"It requires a serious commitment from the highest levels of executives to spend intelligently and appropriately to avert greater opportunities for failure or data breaches," he says.

What can you do about a flight delay?

If you are a passenger, you are probably wondering, what can I do to avoid a technology problem? [19659001] The short answer: That will not work.

Even the best airlines have IT meltdowns. For example, in 2016, Southwest Airlines suffered a massive failure due to a single Cisco router. I offered a game after the IT disaster in my Washington Post column. I also personally supported many of the displaced passengers through my nonprofit consumer protection organization.

But you can have a solid contingency plan. Instead of complaining about social media, look for the air carrier's contract of carriage – the legal agreement between you and the airline – and find out what they can do for you according to their rules. (Here is the Southwest contract.) The DOT, which regulates airlines, notes that airlines are not required by law to provide meals and accommodation. In an IT outage, they do it sometimes.

An airline, especially a discount or low-cost carrier, might claim that a technology issue is an event beyond its control. This is an important distinction when it comes to a flight within or from Europe where EU 261, a Consumer Protection Act, is in force. But that's nonsense. IT problems are avoidable and avoidable and are very much in the sphere of influence of the airline. If an airline claims otherwise, contact the local aviation authorities.

If an IT issue leads to a flight cancellation, your airline must either return you to the next available flight or completely and immediately to your destination. But IT disasters are so embarrassing that most airlines add apologies, free passes and even more excuses to regain you.

After all, they do not want you to be part of the 34 percent.

Christopher Elliott is the founder of Elliott Advocacy, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that empowers consumers to solve their problems and helps those who can not. He is the author of numerous books on consumer protection and writes weekly columns for King Features Syndicate, USA Today and the Washington Post. If you have a consumer problem that you can not solve, contact him directly through his advocacy website. You can also follow him on Twitter Facebook and LinkedIn or sign up for his daily newsletter.

"

If you had a Delta Air Lines ticket last week, maybe your flight It has been delayed for a few hours, you get used to it better: flight delays due to a" technology problem "become a new normal for air travelers. [196591] Passengers unloaded on social media.

Earlier this year in my Washington Post column, I noticed that there was no question if, but if another IT Disaster (IT disaster) would occur.The number of technology-related failures among domestic airlines has risen over the past decade, there was an uneven development, from three in 2007 to six in 2017, the highest number in 2015 at 11.

I hate it if I'm right.

IT issues seem to be growing, and while the causes are complex, the emergency plan is as simple as ever, when an airline cancels your flight and the technology You can not accept that with a shrug.

Technology "problems" get worse

A study by Qualtrics commissioned by Sungard AS, a global IT service company take place. noted that only a single failure can drive out a significant number of customers. More than a third of passengers (34 percent) said they would not book a ticket for an airline with a technological downtime, according to Sungard AS

It's a worldwide problem. For example, earlier this month, Pakistan International Airlines reportedly postponed its flights after the entire booking system "went under." It turned out that the carrier switched to a new Turkish web-based product with the aptly named "HITIT". In August, Spirit Airlines experienced a system-wide service interruption that prevented check-in of passengers. And in June, American Airlines suffered a service outage after a "serious" computer problem. More about this in a minute.

Delta's IT problem remains a mystery. At 8:28 pm, the airline announced that its IT teams are "working diligently" to solve a technology problem affecting some of their systems. "We made a delta stop to get the systems up again as soon as possible," the airline said. "There was no disruption or security problem with a delta flight currently in the air." At 9:20 pm, Delta announced that it had restored all IT systems and announced a "technological problem" to the flight delays. (19659001) And it apologized.

What causes these technological disruptions?

"Although the cause of each occurrence varies, IT issues in the travel industry can be attributed to several overriding factors," said Michael Levine, senior associate at Schellman & Company, an independent security and privacy officer.

Airlines do not like to spend a lot of money on technology, so their systems are outdated before they become overdue, experts say.

"The complexity between many integrated systems – reservations, flight planning, personnel planning, etc. – can lead to breaks in the chain," says Levine. "Airlines often work with regional offices, which means that they are affected by their IT infrastructure and outages."

That's what happened to American Airlines in June. PSA Airlines, a regional subsidiary of American, had a hardware problem with one of its personnel planning systems. "It seems that there was no real backup system, so the outage lasted much longer than necessary," says Levine.

It's not just technology. The major airlines have invested heavily in redundant systems across multiple networks, says Brian Gill, CEO of Gillware Data Recovery. They have "unbelievably redundant" storage arrays in which the transactional databases perform all operations and data is backed up in near real time across multiple sites and private clouds. [196591001] "The weak link in the chain," he explains "people."

Employees and contractors are not adequately trained to monitor the system or fend off cybercrime.

"It only takes one person to do something unbelievably ignorant or stupid," says Gill. The bugs range from a programmer processing data insecurely or a marketing manager who uploads customer data to an insecure third-party app.

"It requires a serious commitment from the highest levels of executives to spend intelligently and appropriately to avert greater opportunities for failure or data breaches," he says.

What can you do about a flight delay?

If you are a passenger, you are probably wondering, what can I do to avoid a technology problem? [19659001] The short answer: That will not work.

Even the best airlines have IT meltdowns. For example, in 2016, Southwest Airlines suffered a massive failure due to a single Cisco router. I offered a game after the IT disaster in my Washington Post column. I also personally supported many of the displaced passengers through my nonprofit consumer protection organization.

But you can have a solid contingency plan. Instead of complaining about social media, look for the air carrier's contract of carriage – the legal agreement between you and the airline – and find out what they can do for you according to their rules. (Here is the Southwest contract.) The DOT, which regulates airlines, notes that airlines are not required by law to provide meals and accommodation. In an IT outage, they do it sometimes.

An airline, especially a discount or low-cost carrier, might claim that a technology issue is an event beyond its control. This is an important distinction when it comes to a flight within or from Europe where EU 261, a Consumer Protection Act, is in force. But that's nonsense. IT problems are avoidable and avoidable and are very much in the sphere of influence of the airline. If an airline claims otherwise, contact the local aviation authorities.

If an IT issue leads to a flight cancellation, your airline must either return you to the next available flight or completely and immediately to your destination. But IT disasters are so embarrassing that most airlines add apologies, free passes and even more excuses to regain you.

After all, they do not want you to be part of the 34 percent.

Christopher Elliott is the founder of Elliott Advocacy, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that empowers consumers to solve their problems and helps those who can not. He is the author of numerous books on consumer protection and writes weekly columns for King Features Syndicate, USA Today and the Washington Post. If you have a consumer problem that you can not solve, contact him directly through his advocacy website. You can also follow him on Twitter Facebook and LinkedIn or sign up for his daily newsletter.


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