Home / US / Getty Fire: & # 39; Extreme & # 39; Warning about strong Santa Ana wind

Getty Fire: & # 39; Extreme & # 39; Warning about strong Santa Ana wind



In a threatening new warning, the National Weather Service issued a rare "extreme red flag alert" for Southern California by Thursday night stating that the wind could be over 120 km / h and the strongest in more than a decade.

Officials Worry The winds may prove catastrophic for the smoldering Getty fire that broke out on Monday just after 1:30 am on the 405 freeway near the Getty Center and quickly spread throughout Tony's neighborhoods. One day after the firing, the flame had burned 658 acres, burnt down several houses, and plunged thousands of residents into the darkness. The fire was contained on early Tuesday at 5%.

Favorable weather conditions ̵

1; including increased humidity and reduced wind speeds – helped firefighters to slow down the growth of the fire overnight, despite flare-ups east of Tigertail Road in Brentwood, where homes had burned hours earlier.

"We have focused on making full use of these conditions overnight," said Margaret Stewart, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Fire Department curbing extreme Santa Ana winds that will arrive overnight and into early Wednesday. The gusts are likely to be the worst that the region has seen this season, said LAFD boss Ralph Terrazas.

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Firefighters fear that the strong winds will remove smoldering embers from the body of fire for miles, triggering new fires in dry brushes or igniting houses.

"It only takes one ember to blow another fire," Terrazas said. "We are very concerned about today's wind event."

For this reason, the fire department officials demand the evacuation of thousands of residents – east of the Temescal Canyon Road, north of Sunset Boulevard, south of Mulholland Drive and west of the 405 Freeway – will remain in force.

Many displaced Angelenos will not be allowed to return to their neighborhoods for at least another day, officials said.

  Evacuation Card

Areas west of the 405 Freeway and north of Sunset Boulevard are under evacuation orders or pre-departure warnings.

(Los Angeles Times)

"I'm sure we were all talking on the phone and talking to people who said, 'Well, there's not much smoke. It should be alright to go home. "I want to keep telling people to listen to the professionals and the firefighters who tell you to stay away," said Mayor Eric Garcetti, adding that the evacuation centers set up on Monday are still open. 19659002] "People will not return to their homes tonight. You should prepare for that now, "said Garcetti.

Being away from home made them angry for those living near the incinerator zone Getty Fire burned the day before and was blocked by park inspectors who had teamed up with two motorcycle police officers. Meanwhile, a long line of cars drove slowly up to Kenter Avenue, where residents asked officials if they could return home.

Marinette Simon and her dog Rusty were among the dozens of residents who sat in their cars for a few minutes, waiting and hoping that they would be allowed to return to their neighborhoods. Most wanted only a few minutes to see their homes and gather items they had wanted before being forced to flee from flames that threatened to overwhelm their community the day before.

Simon wanted to get her husband's cholesterol medication, did the house, passports and hard drives for her daughter, but the police did not let her in.

"It's a little frustrating," she said.

However, Mountaingate residents were allowed to return home on Monday night. However, the officials warned that they should be ready to evacuate again when the fire flares up.

The cause of the fire is unknown. Investigators, however, are focusing on supply lines that began Monday morning along the 405 Freeway in the Sepulveda Pass, according to two sources familiar with the investigation.

Santa Ana blows between 80 and 70 miles per hour with occasional gusts of up to 80 miles per hour in the mountains of Santa Monica and San Gabriel are expected to arrive late Tuesday and last Thursday night, forecasters say. The predicted wind speeds prompted the National Meteorological Service to issue a warning with an extreme red flag warning the public of a high potential for "very rapid fire spread, long-range detection, and extreme fire behavior on new fires."

The worst since we had an event in October 2007, "said National Fisher Service meteorologist Tom Fisher. "Do not let your guard hang."

During the 2007 weather, a series of fires broke out in Southern California, burning more than 200,000 hectares, destroying 1,500 homes, injuring 40 firefighters and causing two casualties. The most significant of these fires was the witch-fire in San Diego County, which ultimately led the region's largest utility to spend about $ 1.5 billion on updating its power grid to avoid future fires.

The strong winds in Santa Ana are the result of a combination of high pressure and cold, dry air from Canada.

The clockwise circulation around this high-pressure system drives north-easterly winds over mountain peaks and through narrow passes and canyons, increasing speed and drying out the air. The air is colder and heavier because it is near the Arctic Circle. Therefore, it gains more momentum than a warmer offshore wind event.

"When you have cold air, it tends to sink and when the wind comes down the mountain speeds up," said Kristen Stewart, meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

The arrival of strong winds throughout the state means that more than 2 million Californians may be losing power again due to concerns Energy suppliers over wind blown devices causing forest fires.

Southern California Edison has already disconnected more than 100 customers and is monitoring another 206,000 customers for possible shutdowns in Kern, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties in the coming days.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. announced on Monday to cut off electricity supply for 605,000 customers on Tuesday and Wednesday forest fire.

The areas affected by the PG & E shutdown are Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Humboldt, Kern, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, San Mateo , Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Tehama, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yolo and Yuba.

Graphics and data reporter Paul Duginski contributed to this report. window.fbAsyncInit = function () {
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Home / US / Getty Fire: & # 39; Extreme & # 39; Warning about strong Santa Ana wind

Getty Fire: & # 39; Extreme & # 39; Warning about strong Santa Ana wind



In a threatening new warning, the National Weather Service issued a rare "extreme red flag alert" for Southern California by Thursday night stating that the wind could be over 120 km / h and the strongest in more than a decade.

Officials Worry The winds may prove catastrophic for the smoldering Getty fire that broke out on Monday just after 1:30 am on the 405 freeway near the Getty Center and quickly spread throughout Tony's neighborhoods. One day after the firing, the flame had burned 658 acres, burnt down several houses, and plunged thousands of residents into the darkness. The fire was contained on early Tuesday at 5%.

Favorable weather conditions ̵

1; including increased humidity and reduced wind speeds – helped the firefighters to slow the growth of the fire overnight, despite flaring east of Tigertail Road in Brentwood, where homes had been burned hours earlier.

"We have focused on making full use of these conditions overnight," said Margaret Stewart, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Fire Department curbing extreme Santa Ana winds that will arrive overnight and into early Wednesday. The gusts are likely to be the worst that the region has seen this season, said LAFD boss Ralph Terrazas.

The Times offers fire protection for free today. Please consider subscribing to support our journalism.

Firefighters fear that the strong winds will remove smoldering embers from the body of fire for miles, triggering new fires in dry brushes or igniting houses.

"It only takes one ember to blow another fire," Terrazas said. "We are very concerned about today's wind event."

For this reason, the fire department officials demand the evacuation of thousands of residents – east of the Temescal Canyon Road, north of Sunset Boulevard, south of Mulholland Drive and west of the 405 Freeway – will remain in force.

Many displaced Angelenos will not be allowed to return to their neighborhoods for at least another day, officials said.

  Evacuation Card

Areas west of the 405 Freeway and north of Sunset Boulevard are under evacuation orders or pre-departure warnings.

(Los Angeles Times)

"I'm sure we were all talking on the phone and talking to people who said, 'Well, there's not much smoke. It should be alright to go home. "I want to keep telling people to listen to the professionals and the firefighters who tell you to stay away," said Mayor Eric Garcetti, adding that the evacuation centers set up on Monday are still open. 19659002] "People will not return to their homes tonight. You should prepare for that now, "said Garcetti.

The possibility that you are not home turned out to be annoying for those living near the incineration zone.

On Sunset Boulevard, most of the roads lead to the houses in the hills where the Getty fire burned the day before and was blocked by park inspectors who had teamed up with two motorcycle police officers. Meanwhile, a long line of cars drove slowly up to Kenter Avenue, where residents asked officials if they could return home.

Marinette Simon and her dog Rusty were among the dozens of residents who sat in their cars for a few minutes, waiting and hoping that they would be allowed to return to their neighborhoods. Most wanted only a few minutes to see their homes and gather items they had wanted before being forced to flee from flames that threatened to overwhelm their community the day before.

Simon wanted to get her husband's cholesterol medication, did the house, passports and hard drives for her daughter, but the police did not let her in.

"It's a little frustrating," she said.

However, Mountaingate residents were allowed to return home on Monday night. However, the officials warned that they should be ready to evacuate again when the fire flares up.

The cause of the fire is unknown. Investigators, however, are focusing on supply lines that began Monday morning along the 405 Freeway in the Sepulveda Pass, according to two sources familiar with the investigation.

Santa Ana blows between 80 and 70 miles per hour with occasional gusts of up to 80 miles per hour in the mountains of Santa Monica and San Gabriel are expected to arrive late Tuesday and last Thursday night, forecasters say. The predicted wind speeds prompted the National Meteorological Service to issue a warning with an extreme red flag warning the public of a high potential for "very rapid fire spread, long-range detection and extreme fire behavior in new fire fires".

The worst since we had an event in October 2007, "said National Fisher Service meteorologist Tom Fisher. "Do not let your guard hang."

During the 2007 weather, a series of fires broke out in Southern California, burning more than 200,000 hectares, destroying 1,500 homes, injuring 40 firefighters and causing two casualties. The most significant of these fires was the witch-fire in San Diego County, which ultimately led the region's largest utility to spend about $ 1.5 billion on updating its power grid to avoid future fires.

The strong winds in Santa Ana are the result of a combination of high pressure and cold, dry air from Canada.

The clockwise circulation around this high-pressure system drives north-easterly winds over mountain peaks and through narrow passes and canyons, increasing speed and drying out the air. The air is colder and heavier because it is near the Arctic Circle. Therefore, it gains more momentum than a warmer offshore wind event.

"When you have cold air, it tends to sink and when the wind comes down the mountain speeds up," said Kristen Stewart, meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

The arrival of strong winds throughout the state means that more than 2 million Californians may be losing power again due to concerns Energy suppliers over wind blown devices causing forest fires.

Southern California Edison has already disconnected more than 100 customers and is monitoring another 206,000 customers for possible shutdowns in Kern, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties in the coming days.

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. announced on Monday to cut off electricity supply for 605,000 customers on Tuesday and Wednesday forest fire.

The areas affected by the PG & E shutdown are Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Humboldt, Kern, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, San Mateo , Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Tehama, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yolo and Yuba.

Graphics and data reporter Paul Duginski contributed to this report.


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