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Home / Entertainment / In front of HBO's Watchmen Stream V for Vendetta, the best Alan Moore adaptation

In front of HBO's Watchmen Stream V for Vendetta, the best Alan Moore adaptation



There are so many streaming options today and so many conflicting recommendations that it's hard to see through all the crap that you could look at. Every Friday, The Verge's Cut the Crap column simplifies the selection by sorting the overwhelming variety of movies and TV shows in subscription services and recommending a single perfect thing to watch this weekend.

What can be seen

V for Vendetta the film adaptation of the politically charged comic by writer Alan Moore and artist David Lloyd from 2006. In a dystopian future of England, the film plays Natalie Portman as an idealistic young woman Evey Hammond, who appears as protégée of "V", an anarchist revolutionary (Hugo Weaving) in a Guy Fawkes mask. The original comic series premiered in Britain in the early 1

980s as an angry response to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's authoritarian stance, and in particular to the nation's increasing intolerance of ethnic minority and LGBTQ citizens. When the collected edition of V for Vendetta was released at the end of the decade, it joined the same adventurous adult fantasy fans who moored earlier pulp-adventure deconstructions in its comic series [19459003verschlungenhatten] Swamp Thing [19659004] Miracleman and Watchmen .

Why right now?

Damon Lindelof's new TV production version of Watchmen debuts in HBO on Sunday night by artist David Gibbons The main plot of the series takes place 30 years after the book's events. (Or in other words, about now.) In a future where the laws against masked guards are now aggressively enforced, HBO's Watchmen acts in part by police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where a violent massacre of police officers led to a new law calling for the police to wear masks and senior detectives who took costumes and people in vigilante style. Tulsa police face the growing threat posed by a militant White-Supremacist organization that itself wears disguises inspired equally by the Ku Klux Klan and the martyr anti-hero Rorschach.

This premise is just a starting point for Lindelof, who is best known for the similarly ambitious TV fantasy / dramas Lost and The Leftovers . In both series, the larger stories have been split into character-driven episodes that tell their own discrete stories. Lindelof's technique corresponds largely to the structure of the book by Moore and Gibbons, which also gives each issue of the comic its own, satisfying bow. The first season of Watchmen with nine episodes jumps in time and place, revealing their overall image through intriguing single fragments that gradually come together.

Do not expect that Lindelof's admiration for Moores work is reciprocal. even though. Alan Moore hates to see his comics adapted to the screen. After several bad experiences, he is asked not to be credited (and unpaid) for all future movie and TV releases. He loudly protested during the campaign for V for Vendetta when the producers claimed he agreed with the film. Although he would have preferred to remain silent, Moore was forced to criticize the changes made by director James McTeigue and author producers Lana and Lilly Wachowski, who updated the social commentary of his book to make it more relevant to George W. Bush – a powerful weapon in the Fight against terrorism.

And yet V for Vendetta is the most creative of all movie versions of Moore's works. Zack Snyders 2009 Watchmen film is slavishly devoted to the visual style and dialogue of the source material, but his attempt to streamline the story into a feature film flattens much of the nuance. Since V for Vendetta was originally serialized in six- to eight-page sections in the Sci-Fi Comics Anthology Magazine Warrior it lends itself in some ways to a film in which the chapters can be rendered as normal-length scenes interrupted by ironic twists. Also, in the comic V for Vendetta Moore and Lloyd often seem to find the plot as they go. The movie version has already set an explosive endpoint, and the filmmakers are carefully building on it.


Photo: Warner Bros.

Who is it for

Wachowski fans and those who like provocative, watchful adventures.

McTeigue and the Wachowskis adapted Moore and Lloyd not only for their V for Vendetta but also brought design elements from other dystopian science-fiction films such as Brazil and the version of 1984 under the direction of the director Michael Radford. They also nodded to the increasing influence of crypto-fascists and state media on geopolitics, using their version of V for Vendetta in Britain in 2032, where the leading television network goes hand in hand with a dictatorial high chancellor ( John Hurt) to prevent social dissidents and political dissidents from having a voice.

For all these reasons, the film has an effect that goes beyond the graphic novel. V for Vendetta Fans who do not know anything about the comic or Guy Fawkes have been inspired by the screen version and have taken over the mask and the message for many different types of protests against the film. From Occupy Wall Street to Arab Spring to Anonymous, V's image is permanent in the movie.

Apart from a few (sometimes significant, sometimes purely cosmetic) changes, the essence of the story comes directly from the book. V for Vendetta is primarily about the education of Evey, who – in the graphic novel and in the most exciting sequence of the film – has completely collapsed emotionally and physically so she can understand the importance of having some to preserve splinters of free thinking. The details vary between the page and the screen, but the loud, defiant support of human individuality is felt in both areas.

Where to see

Netflix. For another fairly faithful adaptation by Alan Moore, the Justice League Unlimited episode "For the Man Who Has Everything" features an abridged but still effective animated version of one of Moore's Superman stories. It is available through DC Universe.


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