Home / US / Lou Saban: Trump repeatedly calls the famous Alabama soccer coach Nick Saban the wrong name

Lou Saban: Trump repeatedly calls the famous Alabama soccer coach Nick Saban the wrong name



When Trump praised Tommy Tuberville, the former head coach of Auburn University, he also praised a football coach named Saban – just not the one who secured five national championships for the state and built a dynasty in Tuscaloosa.

“Really successful coach,” Trump said of Tuberville, whom he strongly supports in the race against his former attorney general, Jeff Sessions. “Hit Alabama like six in a row, but we won’t even mention that. As he said … so maybe we have it Lou Saban … And he’s great, Lou Saban, what a great job he’s done. “

While Trump rightly pointed out that Tuberville Auburn led to six consecutive wins against Alabama between 2002 and 2007, he may refer to Lou Saban, the former Buffalo Bills head coach in the 1

960s, who died in 2009. Lou Saban did so He was briefly at the University of Miami, where he lost to Alabama and Bear Bryant in the 1970s.

In Saban’s second year in Alabama, the Crimson Tide beat the Auburn Tigers 36-0 in the 2008 Iron Bowl. Tuberville resigned days later.

Head coach Nick Saban and the Alabama Crimson Tide celebrate after beating Georgia Bulldogs 35-28 in the 2018 SEC Championship game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on December 1, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Scott Cunningham / Getty Images)

Trump hosted Nick Saban and the Alabama soccer team at the White House in 2018 after briefly participating in the Atlanta National Championship. Last November, he sat in a box at the Bryant Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa for the Alabama LSU game.

The White House and Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment. According to a well-known source, Tuberville Trump did not correct Trump during the call, which is widely regarded as a major faux pas in a state that appreciates college football.

The mistake comes when Trump hopes to convince Alabama voters to do the same by rejecting Jeff Sessions’ offer to regain his old Senate seat. Trump fired sessions as his attorney general in 2018 after never forgiving him for withdrawing from overseeing the Russian investigation, which he believed was recommended by Department of Justice lawyers. Sessions gave up a secure seat in the Senate, which he held for two decades to become Trump’s attorney general.

Trump has met Tuberville and spoken to him several times in the past few months, but doesn’t know him personally. During the Monday night call, Trump said Tuberville would have a “direct connection” to the Oval Office.

“We had the Jeff Sessions thing. We tried it. I had no idea it could be as bad as it was, but he had no idea and he just let it go,” Trump said.

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Trump has approved the opponent of his former attorney general in the race, but Sessions has repeatedly emphasized that Trump has approved two different candidates in the last special Senate election in Alabama. Both candidates lost and a Democrat occupied the seat for the first time in almost 30 years.

“As you know, Alabama does not take orders from Washington,” said Sessions.

The error also comes days after Trump boasted that he “passed” a cognitive test that he “recently” did at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The president has repeatedly voiced doubts about former Vice President Joe Biden’s mental fitness prior to the November election, but has not disclosed when or why he passed the exam. The White House declined to provide additional details.

“I actually took one when I recently, when I – when the radical left said – is it all there? Is it all there? – And I have proven that I was all there because I hit.” I passed the test, “Trump said to Fox News’ Sean Hannity.

The last confirmed cognitive assessment that Trump underwent was part of his physical exam in 2018 when the White House doctor said Trump asked to take the test. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment is a straightforward, 30-question test that correctly draws a clock and identifies animals like a camel.


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