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Thousands of people are headed for a better life, but now numbers are shrinking in response to Trump's US frontier threats.
USA TODAY

MEXICO CITY – A Caravans of hundreds of Central American migrants traveling through Mexico have declined since angering President Trump earlier this week and helping to send National Guard troops to the Southwest border.

Many of the migrants flee from poverty and gang violence in Honduras and other Central American countries in Mexico, where the government has processed documents to allow them to stay, according to several posts in social media.

But some of the migrants are determined to continue their journey to the US border to apply for asylum in this country.

"I would say that the caravan is not dissolved for now in the sense that planned activities are still taking place," said Alex Mensing, an organizer with Pueblo Sin Fronteras.

► April 6: Immigration officials take on reporters after the lawsuit has dropped [April52005: Trump wants to haul 2,000 to 4,000 National Guard troops on Mexican soil [19659010] ► April 5: Trump is not the first president to station the National Guard on the Mexican border

On Friday afternoon, about 630 migrants – about half of them are women and children – are in the bus Puebla arrived, about two hours drive south of here. They are housed in four lodgings.

This weekend, they meet one on one with Mexican and American lawyers. The lawyers will explain the asylum laws in each country to see if the migrants could qualify, said Jordi Ruiz Cirera, a freelance photographer who was traveling with the caravan. On Monday, migrants plan to go to Mexico City, where the caravan will end after a series of demonstrations that participants are planning to stop in key locations to alert people to the plight of refugees Central America flees. ► April 5: Mexican President Trump: "Threatening Attitude" Unjustified
► April 4: President Trump orders National Guard to the Mexican border

Mensing said it It is unclear how many migrants will try to enter the United States and apply for asylum. That depends on the meetings with lawyers.

Many have already decided to stay in Mexico, he said. But some have relatives in the US and are expected to continue their journey.

On Thursday Trump had tweeted that the migrant caravan had disintegrated under pressure from Mexico and the United States.

"The caravan is largely demolished thanks to Mexico's strong immigration laws and its willingness to use them, causing a huge scene on our frontier", tweeted Trump. "Due to the actions of the Trump government, the border crossings are still unacceptable 46 years low. Stop drugs!"

In their peak, the organizers estimated that more than 1,000 migrants had joined the caravan. On March 25, the caravan left Tapachula, a city in the southernmost Mexican state of Chiapas on the border with Guatemala.

The organizers originally said the caravan plans to travel to the US border through Mexico, a journey of more than 2000 miles and ended in Caborca, in the state of Sonora, south of Arizona

► April 3: Trump continues to focus on the Caravan of Honduran Asylum Seekers
► April 2: Donald Trump rhetorically rouses war over Mexico, immigration, DACA

The migrants reached Puebla, the capital of the eponymous state after leaving the city of Matias Romero in the southern state of Oaxaca

Raul Gonzalez, 58, a resident of Mexico who makes his living by van, said the plight of Central American migrants was "a very complicated one Theme".

"What it really is is a political act that draws attention to the plight of migrants from Central America … seeking refuge or asylum."

Christopher Wilson, the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center, in The Caravan across Mexico

He believes Mexico is taking its marching orders from the United States, which is why the government allows many to apply to stay in Mexico.

But Mexico is a poor country compared to the United States, and the US considers it economically low, he said. Therefore, he means that the US should accept the Mesoamerican migrants, not Mexico.

"There are not enough possibilities for us, how can we absorb more?" Gonzalez said.

The Caravan, an annual event, traveled as a group to protect criminals who eat migrants and raise awareness of conditions in Central America that cause people to leave their countries and seek protection in other countries.

"What it really is is a political act paying attention to the plight of Central American migrants coming to the US or Mexico to seek refuge or asylum," said Deputy Director Christopher Wilson of the Wilson Mexico Institute Center, a think tank in Washington DC [19659008] With migrants traveling on foot and in freight trains, organizers expected that the caravan would need more than a month to reach Caborca ​​at the end of April or early May The caravan was still about 1,750 miles from the US border in the southern state. Englisch: www.mjfriendship.de/en/index.php?op…=view&id=167 Oaxaca in Mexico removed when Trump went into rage. The Fox News program Fox & Friends and other media reported that hundreds of migrants traveling in a caravan were heading for the United States and Mexico did little about it.

► April 2nd: Immigration? Do not expect much from Congress before midnight
1. April: Donald Trump tweets at Easter that a Deal for Dreamer is Dead

In a series of tweets, Trump accused the Democrats of Mexico and Central American countries of allowing undocumented immigrants and drugs to flow into this country , He threatened with the end of the North American Free Trade Agreement to put pressure on Mexico to prevent migrants from Central America from reaching the US

The tweets culminated with the signing of a presidential proclamation by Trump on Wednesday that co-ordinated his administration with frontier governors of National Guard troops guarding the southwestern border

Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto (Photo: Marco Ugarte / Associated Press)

In the Proclamation Trump, the arrival of migrants from Central America as a threat to border security on par with opioids and other illicit drugs that "flow across our southern border," and transnational gangs including MS-13.

"The situation at the border has now reached a point of crisis," wrote Trump in a memorandum from the president. "The lawlessness that continues on our southern border is fundamentally incompatible with the security and sovereignty of the American people."

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto urged Trump this week to stop the "threatening or disrespectful attitudes" and constructively discuss the issues with Mexico.

"If your recent statements are the result of domestic, law or congressional frustration, you should contact them, not Mexicans," Peña Nieto told Trump in a video statement, "We will not allow that this negative rhetoric defines our actions, and we will work only in the best interests of the Mexicans. "

The Mexican Senate also passed a resolution calling on its government to stop working with the United States on illegal immigration and drug trafficking Associated Press reported Wednesday. 19659008] This is not the first time that a President has stationed National Guard forces on the southwestern border. In 2006, former President George W. Bush sent about 6,000 National Guard troops in response to aid to secure the border from the governors of Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

► March 30: White House can not protect immigrant teens from abortion, court order
► March 29: ICE is said to keep more pregnant women in immigration custody

In 2010, former President Barack Obama sent about 1,200 troops to the Southwest border to support the border patrol.

But conditions at the border were very different, said Doris Meissner, former immigration and immigration office commissioner under former President Bill Clinton. She is now Senior Fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, a research group

Border Patrol fears are far down, Meissner said, and the Border Patrol has many more agents.

► March 27: California Sues Trump Administration for Census Citizenship Question
► March 27: Trump stops deportation protection for Liberians

Border Patrol registered more than 1 million fears of undocumented cross-border workers, most of them from Mexico

In the 2017 fiscal year, Border Patrol fears fell to 310,000, the lowest levels since the 1970s. The flow of undocumented migrants from Mexico has fallen sharply, while the number of migrants from Central America has increased.

Meanwhile, border police personnel, meanwhile, increased from 12,349 in fiscal 2006 to 19,437 in fiscal 2017, according to Border Patrol data

► March 26: Civil Rights issue back to census for the first time in 70 years
► March 21: Trump, laborers urge Mueller to terminate the Russia probe

Bush ordered the National Guard troops to assist the border patrol, while in addition agents approved by Congress had been hired and trained, said Meissner.

Obama was called on to use National Guard troops, mainly because of political pressure, after Arizona rancher Robert Krentz was killed while working near the border. Meissner

said Trump's decision to send troops to the southwestern border "is rather incoherent," said Meissner, "this picture of land being attacked is not what's taking place." ► March 19: Judge rejects Tennessee's lawsuit seeking to prevent the resettlement of refugees
► February 7: What does President Trump's "Dreamers" policy look like? It's changing all the time

Meissner acknowledges that the US is facing new challenges because Central American migrants are fleeing poverty and violence in their countries. She said the US should work with Mexico to handle what she called a regional problem.

"Mexico does not prosecute just to please the US, but because it has its own important self-interests, we should support them and not endanger them," she said.

Follow Daniel González on Twitter: @azdangonzalez

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