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Home / World / Muslim Americans are pushing leaders and technology companies to stop spreading Islamophobia: NPR

Muslim Americans are pushing leaders and technology companies to stop spreading Islamophobia: NPR



A man leads two young boys to Friday prayers as Muslim worshipers arrive for prayer after mosque raids in New Zealand at the Washington Islamic Center.

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A man leads two young boys to Friday prayers as Muslim worshipers arrive for prayer after mosque raids in New Zealand at the Washington Islamic Center.

Joshua Roberts / Reuters

As New Zealand deals with the aftermath of the attack on two Muslim communities in Christchurch, mass shooting on the other side of the world has aroused anxiety in the Muslim-American communities, leading to renewed appeals against the advent of bigotry in the US -Americans

Muslim Americans urged political leaders, local officials and technology companies to face the alarming spread of hatred and racism that have led to the slaughter of numerous worshipers in religious institutions in recent years.

At a press conference on Friday in Washington, DC, Nihad Awad, executive director of the Council for American-Islamic Relations, called on President Trump to clearly condemn the attacks, saying that his words and policies "increase the lives of innocent people Home and world influence ".

"You should condemn this not just as a hate crime, but as a white terrorist attack." Said Awad.

"You must assure us all – Muslims, blacks, Jews, immigrants – that we are protected and you will not tolerate physical violence against us because we are immigrants or we are minorities and you must clearly condemn this today and you You do not have to be vague, you have to be aware of that. "

The alleged gunman, now in custody with two others, streamed the massacre live on Facebook. In the end, at least 49 people were killed and 48 others were treated in hospitals.

In his writings that set forth his belief, the Australian described himself as a 28-year-old claiming to represent Europeans and whites in a party fighting immigrants – people, He repeatedly referred to as "intruders" throughout the screed, which he had published online in several sources, he cited his hatred of Islam and referred to the second amendment to the US Constitution, in which he argued that government attempts to use weapons take away, would lead to a civil war.

Awad of CAIR referred to President Trump's bias towards hyper-nationalist and xenophobic rhetoric on the electorate and as president, blaming the New Zealand ambush on his feet.

"During your presidency and during your election campaign, Islamophobia rose sharply and attacks on innocent Muslims, innocent immigrants and mosques skyrocketed," said Awad. "We blame you for this growing anti-Muslim sentiment in the country and in Europe, but we do not apologize for these terrorist attacks against minorities at home and abroad."

Similarly, Muslim Advocates, a national civil rights group, urged Trump to despise the aggressors and white nationalist movement in general, who call on the president as the inspiration and symbol of the white identity movement.

"In the wake of this heartbreaking, anti-Muslim mass murder, it's clear that more needs to be done to protect Muslims and vulnerable communities from the very real dangers of hatred and white nationalism. It's time for President Trump, elected officials, law enforcement and technology companies to act, "said the group's executive director, Farhana Khera, in a statement.

Khera took note of Trump's comments from 2017 following the deadly rally of Unite the Right in Charlottesville, Virginia, where the president described the neo-Nazi and white nationalist demonstrators as "very beautiful people."

"This hateful killer," she said with reference to the Christchurch shooter, "was inspired by Trump, and the white nationalist movement has celebrated Trump's words and politics."

As hate crimes by anti-Muslim bigotry in recent years have risen to historic levels in the US, Khera said the FBI must "prioritize the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of right-wing white nationalist violence Security in our nation today. "

In addition, social media platforms and tech companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google, who hate groups to spread vile messages of prejudice and violence and build their membership, need to do more about worrying Recognize and shut down online content, Khera said.

Facebook quickly shut down the terrible video that records the bloodshed in real time, as well as the alleged shooter's Facebook and Instagram accounts. However, at that point, the company could barely do anything about it to prevent Internet users from re-uploading the video to YouTube, Twitter, Reddit, and other online platforms.

"The New Zealand shooter was able to broadcast live a 17-minute video of his murderous rampage, which spreads like wildfire online, which is totally unacceptable, and tech companies must take every possible step to prevent it from happening again happens. "Khera said.

Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove of the Park Avenue Synagogue in New York City bought a massive bouquet of white flowers for Manhattan's Islamic Cultural Center after the mass shootings at two mosques in New Zealand.

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Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove of the Park Avenue Synagogue in New York City bought a massive bouquet of white flowers for Manhattan's Islamic Cultural Center after the mass shootings at two mosques in New Zealand.

Joel Rose / NPR

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) Also pointed to the social media platforms as unintentional mediators of hideous ideology.

"The rapid and widespread adoption of this hateful content – streamed live on Facebook, uploaded to YouTube, and boosted on Reddit – shows how easily the largest platforms can still be misused," said Warner of the Washington Post . "It's becoming increasingly clear that YouTube in particular is not yet fighting its role in facilitating radicalization and recruitment."

Both Twitter and Youtube condemned the attacks and said that they are working to quash any video of the shooting.

Trump on white nationalism

On Friday afternoon, President Trump spoke with reporters The rejected white nationalism is an increasingly dangerous global threat.

"I think it's a small group of people who have very, very serious problems, I think, if you look at what happened in New Zealand, maybe that's the case, I do not know enough about it yet … But it's certainly a terrible thing, "he said.

He made the remarks shortly after signing the first veto of his presidency – a move that allowed him to declare a national emergency along the southern border and pump billions of dollars into building a wall of which he said she was overrun by criminals who want to harm Americans.

"People hate the word invasion, but that's the way it is," Trump said Friday.

Friday Prayer

Muslims gathering in mosques across the country for Friday prayers were united in their grief over the tragedy and their refusal to intimidate.

In New York City, the Islamic Cultural Center opened its door wide and spread out prayer mats for an overflowing crowd in the courtyard.

Reem Elsobky, a doctor from Toronto, told the NPR that it was important to attend prayers at the mosque after learning of the carnage in New Zealand "because we are not afraid to go to our prayer sites come. "

" Everyone should feel safe in prayer, "she said.

Elsobky recalled a similar attack in Canada in 2017, when a gunner in the mosque in Quebec City opened the fire. The memory still haunts her. "Unfortunately, every time I go downtown Toronto to the mosque in Canada, I think about it."

"Will I bring my children or not?" she is often surprised. But in the end she said that people should not be deterred by the possibility of violence. "You can not live your life in fear."

Burjan Ugural, a taxi driver from New York City, said the shooters in New Zealand should be considered terrorists. "Terror has no nationality Terror has no religion No one can say that's Islamic terror, that's Catholic terror." Terror is terror.

Faith leaders from other religions stopped at the mosque to offer their condolences.

Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove of the nearby Park Avenue Synagogue bought a massive bouquet of white flowers and said his community had been in a synagogue during mass shootings not forgotten in Pittsburgh last year.

"The Jewish community knows with shooting in Pittsburgh what it means to promise that the synagogue will be demolished below you," said Cosgrove.

The anti-terrorism The New York Police Department unit stationed heavily armed officers in front of a number of mosques and other religious facilities in New York on Friday.

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The New York Police Department anti-terror unit deployed heavily armed officers in front of several mosques in New York City and other religious facilities on Friday.

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In Washington, DC, Areeba Khan, an intern for Democratic Senator Chris Coons of Delaware, attended the Friday prayer services offered in the Capitol.

"It's a blessed day and to find out that that really happened has hit me in person … I felt really scared right now," Khan told NPR, adding that it was comfortable for her surrounded by members of the Muslim community.

Federal Trade Commission federal contractor Emad Alsagheer said he first heard about the shooting when his friend sent him the livestream video of the attacker. As an immigrant from Syria, he did not expect events such as New Zealand's attack to take place outside war zones.

"I do not expect these things to happen in a peaceful community where people are not in a war or in a war zone," said Alsagheer. "I actually went [Syria] because it was bombed … I was in very bad situations, I witnessed horrible things, but that was really a shock to me because I was not ready [19459065″zusehen]."

Increased Security

Although Interior Minister Kirstjen Nielsen said there are no "current, credible" threats against Muslim communities in the US, mosque security has been tightened across the country.

The New York City Police Department's anti-terror unit stationed heavily armed officers in front of a number of mosques in New York City and other religious institutions.

"To the Muslim community here in New York: We are always at your side and we will be vigilant to protect you – and to make you feel safe too," said Police Commissioner James O & # 39 ;. Neill in a statement .


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