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Home / Business / Powerful iPhone upgrade aborted, Apple Attack from Facebook, and Massive Gamble from MacBook Pro

Powerful iPhone upgrade aborted, Apple Attack from Facebook, and Massive Gamble from MacBook Pro




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If you look back on another week of news and headlines from Cupertino, this week's Apple Loop contains new leaks around the iPhone 11. A powerful iPhone Function was confirmed as canceled, MacBook's ARM gambling, Apple ordered too many screens at Samsung, Jony Ive leaves Apple and its last iPhone design, the new world of the iPad, and why Facebook considers Apple an exclusive club.

Apple Loop is here to remind you of some of the many discussions that have been conducted around Apple over the past seven days (and the weekly summary of the Apple News can be found here.)

More Confirmation that the iPhone 1

1 is getting boring

Tim Cook will be on stage this September to introduce the iPhone, and the invited crowd will whine, roar and surprise themselves But it is clear that there is nothing to surprise. This week we have seen more details. unfortunately the huge camera case is still there and USB-C is nowhere to be seen, as I reported earlier this week:

The outstanding feature of the camera body of the & # 39; stove cooktop & # 39; clearly shows that switching to a three-lens camera (along with the flash and the flash) other sensors dominate the back of the iPhone with the subtlety that Steve Jobs would have thrown his design team behind to demand a rethink. While the camera bulge is now minimized due to the depth of protection over the rest of the back, image reproduction remains annoying.

Also the hoped-for conversion to USB-C is not visible. Although the beta code for iOS 13 suggests replacing the Lightning port with the Universal Connector, the peripheral industry's appeal of using the connector seems to be preventing Apple from joining the rest of the world.

More here on Forbes.

Tim Cook opens Apple's annual product launch on Wednesday, September 12, 2018, at the corporate headquarters in Cupertino, California (Karl Mondon / Digital First Media / Mercury News on Getty Images))

Getty

Advanced Apple's iPhone camera deleted

The biggest loss of the upcoming iPhone, however, lies in the camera technology. Rather than pushing forward with advanced image sensor technology, Tim Cook has discontinued the Quantum Dot product and will rely on regular camera technology for the 2019 iPhones. There is a promise for "3D mapping" for 2020, but that remains to be seen. Still, the Manchester-based company behind the sensor feels the financial pain of losing the iPhone. Gordon Kelly reports:

It's also a devastating blow to Apple's Quantoco dot partner Nanoco in the UK, after the loss was uncovered and its value lowered from £ 93m to just £ 24m. BlueFin Research has also followed this up with sources that confirm that Apple has stopped developing Quantum Dot image sensors for cost reasons. The researchers said that Apple has shifted its attention to 3D laser mapping, but the technology will not be available until 2020 at the earliest.

The news is a blow because not only is the cancellation so late, but QD sensors are also possible, tuned to very specific light spectra, giving iPhones the potential to differentiate current class-leading competitors in 2019. And since the iPhone cameras have lately even lagged behind the budget phones, a serious upgrade has been required for some time.

More here on Forbes.

MacBook's Gamble On ARM Continue

Microsoft has tried the original Surface RT, but does Apple have to learn this lesson itself? Or will the transition from Intel to an ARM-based Mac series be successful? The recent stance suggests that gambling will continue and attract some big names. Random Miller reports:

As Apple continues its efforts to use its own ARM processors on the Mac, it has hired a key developer of ARM. In May, Apple commissioned Mike Filippo to reinforce his Texas-based chip architecture team. ARM has confirmed the departure.

Filippo worked for ARM for 10 years, acting as senior CPU architect and senior systems architect on his LinkedIn. Prior to joining ARM, Filippo worked for AMD and Intel. According to his LinkedIn profile, he joined Apple in May.

More here. 9to5Mac also looked at the latest update for macOS. Jeff Benjamin bears the name "Catalina" (after the archipelago, not the classic World War II seaplane) and introduces the main features of the code:

This latest software update for the Mac is favored by the resolution of iTunes of three featured new stand-alone apps for music, podcasts, and television.

With macOS Catalina checked in as of version 10.15, passwords can also be authenticated with an Apple Watch and an iPad used as an external display. In our practical video you will get an overview of the most important functions of macOS Catalina. You can also subscribe to 9to5Mac on YouTube for more handy videos.

Apple suffers from screen problems

Apple may have to pay for its too optimistic assessment of the required OLED screens. It is likely to be due to the trade agreement that the two companies have signed, but with plans for 100 million screens not being met, someone will feel the financial pain. Gordon Kelly reports:

… Apple faces hundreds of millions of dollars in fines for the biggest problem iPhones face today: Apple is not selling enough. In addition, it is the main competitor Samsung, which relies on Apple, and the consequences will interest any Apple fan.

The reason why Samsung is looking for "hundreds of billions won" (100 billion won over 86 million dollars) is that Apple "demanded" Samsung builds a massive OLED display system exclusively for iPhones. Apple has pushed ahead with its construction because of claims that 100 million OLED iPhone screens are needed per year at the factory, but instead of increasing sales, demand for new iPhones has plummeted.

More here on Forbes.

Ive-y Goodnight

On Thursday night, Apple announced that Chief Design Office John Ive – rare gold badge holder – is leaving the company to start his own design business (News that has been broken) by the FT). Of course, Apple will be its first customer, but do not doubt it … there may be a long lead time, but this is the end of an era. Jon Gruber has some thoughts:

This can be good news. I'm supernaturally talented, to put it clearly. But in the post-work era, where Apple's entire design, hardware, and software were under his control, we saw software design decline and hardware shake. I do not know the inside of the story, but it sure seems like a good bet that the fiasco with the MacBook keyboard we're still in is the direct result of Jony Ive's obsession with device-thinness and minimalism. Today's MacBooks are worse computers, but nicer devices than the ones they replaced. Is that directly due to Jony Ive? Especially with these keyboards, the answer is "yes", in my opinion.

More at Daring Fireball.

Jony Ive, former Cheif Design Officer at Apple, performs on stage at the New York TechFest on Cedar Lake (photo by Brian Ach / Getty Images for The New Yorker)

Getty

A last gift from Jony

Due to long design lead times, Ive's handcrafting will be reflected in Apple's hardware for a number of years, including changes from next year's iPhone family. Gordon Kelly Looks at the Decisions He Made:

After the sensational news that Apple is killing its 5.8-inch iPhone X / XS / 11 and replacing it with a smaller 5.4-inch flagship, Let us now imagine how exciting this new model will be. And it's a really radical move that is likely to mislead Apple's major rivals.

Swedish graphic designer Max Rudberg has made a true-to-scale drawing of Apple's new 5.4-inch powerhouse alongside the 5.8-inch iPhone XS, 4.7-inch iPhone 8 and 4-inch iPhone SE , While many expected an iPhone in size 8, the new model is almost as big as the iPhone SE thanks to its minimal bezels.

More here on Forbes.

The New World Of iPad OS

With the introduction of iPadOS, Apple's tablet has evolved from a "big" iPhone to a stand-alone product. No smartphone, no desktop or laptop, but something new. Rahul Lal Looks at the Promise of a Different Future:

This year, at the Apple World Wide Developer Conference, there was an important announcement about the future of iOS on the iPad. iOS 13 had its presentation without iPad features. This proved to be a moment of shock, but this mental electrical wire would change. After the announcement of iOS 13, Apple has introduced a brand new operating system just for the iPad: iPadOS. I remember seeing the event and hearing the crowd go crazy when it was announced. The reason? Because the iPad would finally get the right treatment to realize its true purpose.

More on Medium.com.

The Vice President of Facebook, Nick Clegg, gives a speech at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin on June 24th. 2019. (Photo by Tobias Schwarz / AFP / Getty Images)

Getty

And finally …

Is Apple an Exclusive Club? Facebook CEO for global affairs, Nick Clegg, recently introduced the idea to the public in a presentation in the UK, without mentioning Apple directly. Given Apple's fluctuations on Facebook, which fail to mention Mark Zuckerberg's team, it is clear that the cold war of words continues. Jake Kanter reports:

"Facebook is free – it's for everyone," he said. "Some other big tech companies make their living selling expensive hardware or subscription services, or in some cases both, to consumers in developed, more prosperous economies, and they are an exclusive club that's only available to budding consumers who have the opportunity to buy quality products. " Hardware and Services.

The obvious example he is looking for is Apple, which makes iPhones for $ 1,000 and sells subscriptions to music, television and news to one billion users.

More at Business Insider. [19659001] Apple Loop offers seven days of highlights on Forbes every weekend, and do not forget to follow me so you do not miss any coverage in the future – last week's Apple Loop can be read here, or this week's Loop, Android section Circuit, is also available at Forbes The Apple Loop of the Week contains new leaks around the iPhone 11, a powerful iPhone feature has been confirmed as canceled, the ARM gambling for the MacBook, Apple orders too many screens at Samsung, Jony Ive leaves Apple and its latest iPhone design, the new world of the iPad and why Facebook considers Apple an exclusive club.

Apple Loop is here to To remind you of some of the numerous discussions that have been conducted around Apple over the past seven days (and the weekly Apple News overview can be found here).

Further confirmation that the iPhone 11 is getting boring

Tim Cook will be kicking off this September to announce the iPhone, and the invited crowd will moan, yell and be surprised. But it is clear that t here there is nothing to surprise. This week we have seen more details, unfortunately, the huge camera body is still present, and USB-C is nowhere to be seen, as I reported earlier this week:

The outstanding feature of the camera body for the oven hob clearly shows that the Switching to a three-lens camera (along with the flash and other sensors) dominates the back of the iPhone with the subtlety that Steve Jobs would have accused his design team of if he had demanded a rethink. While the camera bulge is now minimized due to the depth of protection over the rest of the back, image reproduction remains annoying.

Also the hoped-for conversion to USB-C is not visible. Although the beta code for iOS 13 suggests replacing the Lightning port with the Universal Connector, the peripheral industry's appeal of using the connector seems to be preventing Apple from joining the rest of the world.

More here on Forbes.

Tim Cook opens Apple's annual product launch on Wednesday, September 12, 2018, at the corporate headquarters in Cupertino, California. (Karl Mondon / Digital First Media / Mercury News on Getty Images)

Getty

Apple's advanced iPhone camera deleted

The biggest loss of the upcoming iPhone, however, lies in the camera technology. Rather than pushing forward with advanced image sensor technology, Tim Cook has discontinued the Quantum Dot product and will rely on regular camera technology for the 2019 iPhones. There is a promise for "3D mapping" for 2020, but that remains to be seen. Still, the Manchester-based company behind the sensor feels the financial pain of losing the iPhone. Gordon Kelly reports:

It's also a devastating blow to Apple's Quantoco Dot partner Nanoco in the UK after the loss was uncovered and its value lowered from £ 93m to only £ 24m. BlueFin Research has also followed this up with sources that confirm that Apple has stopped developing Quantum Dot image sensors for cost reasons. The researchers said that Apple has shifted its attention to 3D laser mapping, but the technology will not be available until 2020 at the earliest.

The news is a blow because not only is the cancellation so late, but QD sensors are also possible, tuned to very specific light spectra, giving iPhones the potential to differentiate current class-leading competitors in 2019. And since the iPhone cameras have lately even lagged behind the budget phones, a serious upgrade has been required for some time.

More here on Forbes.

MacBook's Gamble On ARM Continue

Microsoft has tried the original Surface RT, but does Apple have to learn this lesson itself? Or will the transition from Intel to an ARM-based Mac series be successful? The recent stance suggests that gambling will continue and attract some big names. Random Miller reports:

As Apple continues its efforts to use its own ARM processors on the Mac, it has hired a key developer of ARM. In May, Apple commissioned Mike Filippo to reinforce his Texas-based chip architecture team. ARM has confirmed the departure.

Filippo worked for ARM for 10 years, acting as senior CPU architect and senior systems architect on his LinkedIn. Prior to joining ARM, Filippo worked for AMD and Intel. According to his LinkedIn profile, he joined Apple in May.

More here. 9to5Mac also looked at the latest update for macOS. Jeff Benjamin bears the name "Catalina" (after the archipelago, not the classic World War II seaplane) and introduces the main features of the code:

This latest software update for the Mac is favored by the resolution of iTunes of three featured new stand-alone apps for music, podcasts, and television.

With macOS Catalina checked in as of version 10.15, passwords can also be authenticated with an Apple Watch and an iPad used as an external display. In our practical video you will get an overview of the most important functions of macOS Catalina. You can also subscribe to 9to5Mac on YouTube for more handy videos.

Apple has no screen promise [19659001] In the meantime, Apple may be forced to pay Samsung for its overly optimistic assessment of the OLED screens required. It is likely to be due to the trade agreement that the two companies have signed, but with plans for 100 million screens not being met, someone will feel the financial pain. Gordon Kelly reports:

… Apple faces hundreds of millions of dollars in fines for the biggest problem iPhones face today: Apple is not selling enough. In addition, it is the main competitor Samsung, which relies on Apple, and the consequences will interest any Apple fan.

The reason why Samsung is looking for "hundreds of billions won" (100 billion won over 86 million dollars) is that Apple "demanded" Samsung builds a massive OLED display system exclusively for iPhones. Apple has pushed ahead with its construction because of claims that 100 million OLED iPhone screens are needed per year at the factory, but instead of increasing sales, demand for new iPhones has plummeted.

More here on Forbes.

Ive-y Goodnight

On Thursday night, Apple announced that Chief Design Office John Ive – rare gold badge holder – is leaving the company to start his own design business (News that has been broken) by the FT). Of course, Apple will be its first customer, but do not doubt it … there may be a long lead time, but this is the end of an era. Jon Gruber has some thoughts:

This can be good news. I'm supernaturally talented, to put it clearly. But in the post-work era, where Apple's entire design, hardware, and software were under his control, we saw software design decline and hardware shake. I do not know the inside of the story, but it sure seems like a good bet that the fiasco with the MacBook keyboard we're still in is the direct result of Jony Ive's obsession with device-thinness and minimalism. Today's MacBooks are worse computers, but nicer devices than the ones they replaced. Is that directly due to Jony Ive? Especially with these keyboards, the answer is yes, in my opinion.

More at Daring Fireball.

Jony Ive, Apple's former Cheif Design Officer, performs on stage at the New York TechFest on Cedar Lake (photo by Brian Ach / Getty Images for The New Yorker)

Getty

One last gift from Jony

Due to long design lead times, Ive's handcrafting will be reflected in Apple's hardware for a number of years, including changes from next year's iPhone family. Gordon Kelly Looks at the Decisions He Made:

After the sensational news that Apple is killing its 5.8-inch iPhone X / XS / 11 and replacing it with a smaller 5.4-inch flagship, Let us now imagine how exciting this new model will be. And it's a really radical move that is likely to mislead Apple's major rivals.

Swedish graphic designer Max Rudberg has made a true-to-scale drawing of Apple's new 5.4-inch powerhouse alongside the 5.8-inch iPhone XS, 4.7-inch iPhone 8 and 4-inch iPhone SE , While many expected an iPhone in size 8, the new model is almost as big as the iPhone SE thanks to its minimal bezels.

More here on Forbes.

The New World Of iPad OS

With the introduction of iPadOS, Apple's tablet has evolved from a "big" iPhone to a stand-alone product. No smartphone, no desktop or laptop, but something new. Rahul Lal Looks at the Promise of a Different Future:

This year, at the Apple World Wide Developer Conference, there was an important announcement about the future of iOS on the iPad. iOS 13 had its presentation without iPad features. This proved to be a moment of shock, but this mental electrical wire would change. After the announcement of iOS 13, Apple has introduced a brand new operating system just for the iPad: iPadOS. I remember seeing the event and hearing the crowd go crazy when it was announced. The reason? Because the iPad would finally get the right treatment to realize its true purpose.

More on Medium.com.

Facebook's Vice President Nick Clegg gives a speech at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin on June 24th. 2019. (Photo by Tobias Schwarz / AFP / Getty Images)

Getty

And finally …

Is Apple an Exclusive Club? Facebook CEO for global affairs, Nick Clegg, recently introduced the idea to the public in a presentation in the UK, without mentioning Apple directly. Given Apple's fluctuations on Facebook, which fail to mention Mark Zuckerberg's team, it is clear that the cold war of words continues. Jake Kanter reports:

"Facebook is free – it's for everyone," he said. "Some other big tech companies make their living selling expensive hardware or subscription services, or in some cases both, to consumers in developed, more prosperous economies, and they are an exclusive club that's only available to budding consumers who have the opportunity to buy quality products. " Hardware and Services.

The obvious example he is looking for is Apple, which makes iPhones for $ 1,000 and sells subscriptions to music, television and news to one billion users.

More at Business Insider. [19659001] Apple Loop offers seven days of highlights on Forbes every weekend, and do not forget to follow me so you do not miss any coverage in the future – last week's Apple Loop can be read here, or this week's Loop, Android section Circuit, is also available from Forbes.


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