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The first reviews of First Man.



  Ryan Gosling in first man

Ryan Gosling in first man ( 2018)

Universal Pictures

Room! Now that I have your attention, the reviews of Damien Chazelle's First Man which had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, are in today – and fortunately, like the movie itself, there's really no way for she, to spoil the end. The space drama follows Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) in his literal and metaphorical journey to become the first man on the moon.

It's a story and a genre we know all too well, but that does not hold back the movie – even improves its galactic ancestors. Critics agree that the story of Chazelle is handled masterfully, mixing realism with awe, without exaggerating the drama.

And, of course, it's just an irresistible opportunity to use room metaphors, whether it's about "rising," "sky-high expectations," "slipping [ping] the grumpy gang of the earth, or" [ing] the moon. "(Michael Nordine at IndieWire wins this space race:" Chazelle is an experienced flight commander who directs the action with the elegance of a space dance in one scene and the intensity of a rocket launch in the next scene … It may not be a big jump for filmmaking but it is another small step for this filmmaker. ")

Here are the first impressions of First Man to be opened on October 12:

Chazelle overcomes the great challenges of a story in which the audience knows the end.

Michael Nordine, Indie Wire:

You know how "First Man" ends. It has been almost half a century since man walked on the Moon, and almost as long as space exploration was at the forefront of America's collective imagination, meaning that Damien Chazelle's successor to La La Land has more challenges has to cope with as it might first appear. They are easy to overcome: "First Man" is an anti-thriller of rare intensity.

Alonso Duralde, the Wrap:

Those of us who were born in the late sixties and beyond have always taken the moon landing as a great achievement, yes, but also as a kind of accomplished fact. In his dynamic follow-up to "La La Land," director Damien Chazelle recalled that space exploration was always risky and frightening …. "First Man" portrays NASA's great achievements as huge games of chance; Like the best historical dramas, the film creates suspense about events whose outcome we already know.

We have also seen many space films, but First Man beats out his ancestors.

Owen Gleiberman, variety:

"First Man" has the same relationship to the space dramas that "Saving Private Ryan" previously made in war films. The film redefines what traveling is like – living in our imagination – and captures for the first time what was really at stake … "First Man" is so insistent in its slippery, raging, melting metal Authenticity A space drama like "Apollo 13" looks like a puppet show.

Alonso Duralde, the wrap:

The idea of ​​how scary it must have been in these space capsules has been explored before, especially in "The Right Stuff", but Chazelle continues to lead us; When Armstrong climbs into Gemini 8 and crashes into the sky, we've never felt this claustrophobia or heard the creaking of the metal or even felt the rocket hit in a movie.

The film is intensely atmospheric from its first moments …

Michael Nordine, IndieWire:

It begins with a sequence so intense that you think – or at least hope – that it must be a daunting dream before the mission, with Neil Armstrong's (Gosling's) wobbly death trap rising higher into the atmosphere than planned she falls back to earth … The sound is deafening, the sight dizzying. It's a revealing opener, not least because of the way it immediately reminds us that this is actually life or death: Apollo 11 may have been a success, but it was preceded by many deadly mistakes. Regardless of space forces, we tend not to look at the night sky as we used to. Chazelle restores some of these wonders.

… and Chazelle encourages us to see things the astronauts did …

Owen Gleiberman, Variety:

In "First Man," Chazelle limits the action almost exclusively to the astronauts themselves: the things they see and see during their missions (the film avoids panoramic shots that they are not privy to) along with what they think and feel. From the dizzying and volatile opening sequence in which Armstrong, as a test pilot in 1961, lifts an X-15 into the black clouds and races through the air to the point where he almost does not return (Mission Control: "Neil, you leap from the atmosphere from "), the film is bound to everything the men experience: the random shards of the sky emerging from narrow windows, the hazy nooks, the whole existential interior cockpit zoom – in-the-blank craziness of everything ,

Michael Nordine, Indie Wire:

Like Armstrong, it grows under pressure: "First Man" is well-crafted and tightly controlled, adapts to extreme situations in flight, forcing us to experience any death-defying performance with the astronauts they have lived through – and in In some cases, not … Chazelle is so successful in getting you into the cold, claustrophobic spacecraft that Neil never really leaves – we're often just inches from his face, whether behind a visor or not – that's us sometimes at sea when it comes to understanding what exactly these men are and why it matters so much. If you want to know the exact purpose of the Gemini 8 mission, search in advance – "First Man" will not tell you. It's a first-person procedure, less concerned with the basics of these ventures than with the experience of a single man.

… to preserve a feeling of gritty realism and exaggerate the drama.

David Rooney, the Hollywood Reporter:

With his cinematographer La La Land Linus Sandgren, Chazelle recapses the pressure at home and in the room with a handheld camera and a quick edit by editor Tom Cross. But the technique is never flashy or distractingly nervous, but reflects the tight control you find elsewhere.

Owen Gleiberman, Variety:

Oddly enough, the moon landing itself finds its drama in the uncanny naturalness with which Chazelle stages it. Here's an event that we believe is already the best sci-fi movie reality of all time, so First Man plays neutral and blank, showing us the moon through the capsule window as a death zone of glowing rubble. then he revels in the texture of the sand, in the creepy seclusion of Armstrong, who looks down at his boot as he takes that first step. It's a stunning victory with a hidden touch of surreal, maybe even madness. It makes Neil Armstrong a hero, but he has to return to reality.

The film is patriotic, but not patriotic to meets exactly the right tone in this political climate.

Owen Gleiberman, variety:

… it should be a cathartic experience for the audience to relive the spirit of what America once did and what America once was. After seeing First Man, it's doubtful whether you're thinking about space travel or Armstrong's historic hike in a similar way. You will know more deeply how it happened, what it meant and what it was and why its secret – more than ever – still persists.

Alonso Duralde, the wrap:

In a broader sense, "First Man" reminds us – in an era of "Truth is not Truth," "Alternative Facts" and established science treated like one opinion – that there was not a very long time ago We (the taxpayer, not just a bored billionaire) were able to send people to space and the moon and back again. And we did it to quote JFK, "not because it was easy, but because it was hard." In a time of widespread hopelessness, it's a lesson to remember.

Peter Bradshaw, the Guardian:

It is also a movie that minimizes the patriotic fervor of the landing. Armstrong and his comrades are certainly haunted by the news of the first Soviet triumphs in the space race, but Chazelle no longer manages to plant stars and stripes on the moon.

David Rooney, the Hollywood Reporter:

Perhaps most notable is the film's refusal to engage in the anticipated jingoistic self-surrender that seems to demand such a milestone. At a time when the toxic political climate has cheapened this nationalist fervor and turned it into empty rhetoric, the measured qualities of Josh Singer's script, based on James R. Hansen's 2005 biography of Armstrong, can be enjoyed.

Gosling is a star …

David Rooney, the Hollywood Reporter:

Here, Gosling plays down his natural charisma to portray a man who just wants to do a job, approaches him with the utmost seriousness and without ego … Gosling attracts you on an intimate level, no matter if Armstrong finds himself in life situations or simply staring at the moon from his garden, as if the distant image somehow holds the secret of a successful landing. It is a subdued, almost selfish performance that still gives the drama a commanding center.

Owen Gleiberman, Variety:

Gosling gives a tricky, compelling performance that's growing on you. He plays Armstrong as a crafty daredevil who has learned to hold most of what he feels internally (he wrote musicals at school and is now ashamed of it). Yet, he just emits enough emotions, especially when someone crosses him to send a soft command. … Gosling turns Armstrong into a figure of an intensely restrained can-do moxie whose ability to lead a ship, especially on the threshold of death, is the essence of the pressurized grace.

Michael Nordine, IndieWire:

Armstrong is considered by his contemporaries as an egghead and is a cerebral presence that seeks to see beyond the known world, even though he retains his inner life. That would be a bigger challenge for the actor if he did not already have the habit of playing rock-faced (anti) heroes, and Gosling brings back his quiet charisma.

… as does Claire Foy as his wife Janet, though her talent for a generic biopic woman-black hole could easily be lost.

Stephanie Zacharek, TIME:

… played by Claire Foy

Peter Bradshaw, the Guardian:

a thankless role for Claire Foy

Michael Nordine, IndieWire:

… as so often happens in movies of this kind, she depends on being just the worried woman. Foy is doing her best to bring something new to this familiar role, even though it gives him a tenacity that fits her family tree.

David Rooney, the Hollywood Reporter:

The latter is played by Claire Foy in a rousing performance that gracefully avoids clichés when moving between an emotionally supportive and solid backbone and an open, questioning nature.


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