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The giants are ruining everything for Madison Bumgarner's suitor



Photo: Jason O. Watson (Getty)

Plans are changing. That's the best thing about them. Unflexible thought ignites, and only the skilful bully survives. Kawhi Leonard changed the topography of the NBA by winning a championship. Anthony Davis changed it by destroying New Orleans hope before the first national anthem was screamed. And Madison Bumgarner … well, it's hard to say how much he's going to change, because he and his friends in San Francisco decided at the last minute to disrupt their boss's big plan at a price their own flea market makes all honor.

That's what keeps you from standing up to long-term business planning.

For months, March, April, May and June, the Giants have been among the most arduous and difficult watches in the game: old, slow, offensively sluggish and hopeless. They had overturned their baseball operations department and then lost their CEO Larry Baer through permanent invisibility when a public altercation with his wife on his cell phone caused his suspension and replacement. They vomited in the first half with record levels, a shot average and additional metrics, creating a team that was as boring and hopeless as the Tigers and Marlins, and yes, even the Orioles.

Back then – I mean, the end of June as "then" is a pretty ridiculous point of reference, but here we are – new baseball Overlord Farhan Zaidi knew that Bumgarner and closer Will Smith were his tradable chips and he knew that there would be a sellers' market for both. The truck would be reset and the cleanup would begin; The happiest job of a new general manager for a franchise that had been trapped in the traps of three very old parades.

Then it happened. The Giants started to score (they have the most runs in baseball in July, 6.8 per game) and they won close matches (three extra-inning victories over the Mets this weekend, five a month and seven one-run Overall victories). , won (they have won 14: 3 since the first of the month), and Bumgarner's so-so-season has been brilliant. To sum it up, he went from a safe trade piece to maybe a bit to keep up, as his team moved from a 14th Miamiesque to a draw for eighth place, just 2 1/2 games south of the modest ones Wild card line of the National League. 19659004] And now Zaidi has nine days to find out if his team has the right or just to go.

Bumgarner is clearly the key, because in the New World Order, nothing counts in the sport as the close of trading, unless it is the period of the free agency or the transmission window. The games are a nuisance. This is one of the reasons why the asteroids and meteors should mark our donkeys sooner rather than later, but this is an exercise that must be written for money for another day. We're talking about Bumgarner, a weighty chip on an otherwise so-blue trading market in a team that needs every perspective he can get. Bear in mind that Bumgarner has increased its appetite towards the one-pitch pitcher crowd (Atlanta, Boston, Houston, Milwaukee, Minnesota, the newly raped Yankees) by literating these empties at their bedside table by taking the chance reduces the Giants launching it on the market. A team in the bubble could die there, even if the Giants miss the postseason. As a result, a Director-General is declared docile and ambitious. This shows Zaidi, whose job is new and therefore safe, in his first twisted moment when you're doing it / hosed down, the non-mob equivalent of making his bones while dancing on someone else. 19659004] And we say, "Yes, please." It's not Kawhi-level chess, but it's approaching socialist roulette, and we're taking this as the first attempt at baseball in the brave new world.

Zaidi started as a hyperkinetic seller. He treated the transaction wire like Tinder looking for someone to replace Bruce Bochy's last season. At the same time, his reputation as a baseball thinker had been reinforced by the few years he needed to blow up and then revive the franchise. This includes moving the right field fences to the legendary old What & # 39; s This Place Named This Week Park.

Against this dynamic, Bear's successor as investor front man, Rob Dean, gets a feel for a fresh fanbase that only needed a seemingly hopeless team that won 40 percent of their games to win 83 percent of their games remembering how a lot of fun baseball can be. Does he want to be a buzzkill at work in his first seven months or at least agree with Zaidi? You can only make a first impression and that way Dean is in a strange place like Zaidi. Hurray potential suicide! Make 5.4 million middle fingers bloom (one from each hand of the 2.7 million fans who see the giants come, or more)!

In short, the giants win at an unsustainable pace at the worst possible time for them. Long-term plan, and with just nine days to figure out who, what and why they're standing in front of the votes in Zaidi's head, they just start getting themselves yelling. Are you the dreamer or the killjoy? Buy the next round of beer or call the police at the party? And is this a party you would like to host?

And if THAT is not what potential young baseball fans can leave behind ("Why is this guy with the glasses pulling his head off at the dugout?" Is a skull plasma shower just really cool marketing? ") Then it's the game irreparable.

Zaidi has to watch this week as his reluctant Moloch plays the Cubs before heading to San Diego to visit the fading Padres and Philadelphia Phillies are next week. Bumgarner will set up Tuesday and then next Tuesday with all competitors drinking from his dog's dish. If this is the new baseball – winning today or tearing it to pieces – I think it can survive, at least until the planet goes into lifeless oblivion. Maybe even 10 years.


Ray Ratto likes when great long-term plans inspired and executed by people working in offices go to hell before our eyes, and the rest of you as well.


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