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The stunning NASA image shows a “fluffy galaxy” 67 million light years away from Earth



NASA’s Hubble telescope discovers a breathtaking “fluffy galaxy” that is 67 million light years from Earth

  • The galaxy is called NGC 2275 and is around 67 million light years from Earth
  • It can be found in the constellation of cancer and appears to be “fluffy”
  • The feather-light appearance is probably a sign that the galaxy has been quiet for some time

NASA’s Hubble telescope has taken an incredible picture of a “fluffy” galaxy.

The usual spiral appearance of the galaxy is complemented by a delicate feathery appearance on the edges.

It is called NGC 2275 and is located around 67 million light years from Earth in the constellation Cancer.

The picture was taken with Hubble and required the expertise of astronomers at both the European Space Agency and the US-based space agency.

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The Hubble telescope from NASA has an incredible picture of one

The Hubble telescope from NASA has taken an incredible picture of a “fluffy” galaxy (picture). It is called NGC 2275 and is located around 67 million light years from Earth in the constellation Cancer

Fluffy galaxies like NGC 2275 are described by astronomers as flaky.

Other spiral galaxies like the Milky Way have clearer, sharper arms.

The arms of NCG 2275 consist of gas clouds that have spread over time due to the rotation of the galaxy and are divided by large dust clouds.

In the center of the galaxy there is a large galactic bulge that contains almost no stars because the gas and matter have already been used up here.

In addition to the bizarre, fluffy look, the striking beauty of the galaxy is enhanced by numerous light blue dots.

Fluffy galaxies like NGC 2275 are described by astronomers as flaky.  Other spiral galaxies like the Milky Way (image) have clearer, sharper arms.  The arms of NCG 2275 are made of gas clouds that have spread over time due to the rotation of the galaxy

Fluffy galaxies like NGC 2275 are described by astronomers as flaky. Other spiral galaxies like the Milky Way (picture) have clearer, sharper arms. The arms of NCG 2275 are made up of gas clouds that have spread over time due to the rotation of the galaxy

“Millions of bright, young, blue stars shine in the complex, feather-like spiral arms that are intertwined with dark dust traces,” says a statement by ESA.

‘It is believed that complexes of these hot, blue stars trigger star formation in nearby gas clouds.

The disk of the Milky Way shakes like a spinning top

The Milky Way has a “kink” or chain in its disc that “wobbles like a spinning top” and may have resulted from an ongoing collision with a nearby dwarf galaxy.

It was first discovered in the late 1950s, but until recently, astronomers have not been able to pinpoint exactly what caused the galactic disk to malform.

The ESA team now believes that it must have been caused by a powerful collision with another galaxy – possibly the nearby dwarf galaxy Sagittarius.

‘The entire feather-like spiral patterns of the arms are formed by shearing the gas clouds when the galaxy rotates.

“The spiral nature of flaky galaxies contrasts with the great spirals that have prominent, well-defined spiral arms.”

Hubble is NASA’s most powerful space telescope and was first launched in 1990.

It is named after the famous astronomer Edwin Hubble, who was born in Missouri in 1889.

He is probably best known for discovering that the universe is expanding and at what speed this is happening – now he has shaped the Hubble constant.

It orbits the earth at a speed of 27,300 km / h in a low earth orbit at an altitude of 340 miles.

Hubble has an accuracy of 0.007 arcseconds, which is like putting a laser beam on Franklin D. Roosevelt’s head, which is about 320 km away.

Hubble’s primary mirror is 2.4 meters in diameter and a total of 13.3 meters long – the length of a large school bus.

The much belated James Webb telescope will succeed as NASA’s marquee telescope in the coming years.

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