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VR never looked so good



In a demo at the HTC office in San Francisco, I tried out the original Vive and the new Vive Cosmos one after the other. It was amazing how different the two headsets are. The overall ergonomics of the Cosmos has been significantly improved. Mooring is much easier, for example. While the original had different headbands, the new headset uses a simpler Halo system similar to that of the Pro and PS VR, with an adjustable hard plastic back and a single Velcro on the top. An HTC employee slipped it on my head like a baseball cap and with a few simple gestures I got started. In comparison, the Cosmos also feels much easier.

What I really appreciate is that the Cosmos' goggles have been configured to better fit a wider range of face shapes. For example, although HTC said you could wear glasses with the original Vive, I always thought that it would be uncomfortable to do so ̵

1; mine would press against my eyes. With the new Cosmos this was no problem at all. There was much more space. As with many other headsets, there is also an IPD dial – the Cosmos is on the right side – with which you can set the distance between the lenses. And thanks to the overall upholstery, it felt tight, but not tight. I felt like I could definitely wear it for hours.

  HTC Vive Cosmos "data-caption =" HTC Vive Cosmos "data-credit =" Nicole Lee / Engadget "data-credit-link-back =" "data -dam-provider =" "data-local-id = "local-4-31313-1568245967869" data-media-id = "6badbe9a-5569-420d-b30e-7c163a92e4ec" data-original-url = "https: // s.yimg.com/os/creatr-uploaded-images / 2019-09 / 3568e590-d4ef-11e9-afe3-e193f83fbf20 "data-title =" HTC Vive Cosmos "src =" https://o.aolcdn.com/images/ dims? crop = 1600% 2C900% 2C0% 2C0 & quality = 85 & format = jpg & resize = 1600% 2C900 & image_uri = https% 3A% 2F% 2Fs.yimg.com% 2Fos% 2Fcreatr-uploaded-images% 2F2019-09% 2F3568e590-d4-11e9-afe3-e193f83fbf20 & client = a1acac3e1b3290917d92 & signature = edd39a5e9f3dcadee724c899ccf0d11829e95121 "/> </p>
<p>  Another big difference is that the eye area of ​​the cosmos actually sounds a lot better, in practice I did not like it When you lift the safety goggles, the whole headset is out of whats the front end, as if it's about to slip off, the HTC representative said it was probably due to the smoothness of my hair, the rear end did not have that much support on my head but hardly that people with straight, long hair are a rarity, so I found this answer less than satisfactory. </p>
<p>  If you want to see what is going on around you, but do not want to flip the headset up, there is an aging ative. The Vive Cosmos has a built-in through-camera that lets you see what's around you without touching the headset. To enable this, either go beyond the digital boundaries (basically go beyond the virtual grid wall) or double-tap the Vive button on the controller. The result is a dreadfully blurry look at your surroundings – in my case, a living room in the HTC office in San Francisco. </p><div><script async src=

It was so blurry that I could barely see the faces of people. O & Brien admits that it is not very good at the moment. "It's pretty primitive now, yes," he said. The reason it's so bad is because Cosmos uses the same cameras for tracking and passthrough capabilities, and HTC has decided to favor low latency over resolution for responsive tracking. "But we'll improve that over time," he added. That said, it was at least a quick way to get in and out of VR if you need to.

  HTC Vive Cosmos "data-caption =" HTC Vive Cosmos "data-credit =" Nicole Lee / Engadget "data-mep =" 3043212 "src =" https://o.aolcdn.com/images/dims? crop = 1600% 2C900% 2C0% 2C0 & quality = 85 & format = jpg & resize = 1600% 2C900 & image_uri = https% 3A% 2F% 2Fs .yimg.com% 2Fos% 2Fcreatr-uploaded-images% 2F2019-09% 2F01459380-d4ef-11e9-b6ef- fcd9e9ece338 & client = a1acac3e1b3290917d92 & signature = 9cb5b7c36f4f3816678. With brand new RGB LCD panels, a resolution of 2,880 x 1,700 pixels (which is 88 percent more than the original), a field of view of 110 degrees and a refresh rate of 90 Hz, the result is the best VR display I have I ever seen. For example, with the original Vive headset, the blue whale looked huge and lifelike in the well-known <em> Wevr: TheBlu </em> demo. However, with the Cosmos, it was much more o to make the whole experience even more intense. It really felt like the whale was right next to me. I could see details that I had not seen before, such as wrinkles around the eyes and warts and imperfections on the skin. The colors also looked stronger and more saturated; The blue was deeper and the shadows darker and more nuanced. </p>
<p>  One of the most outstanding features of the Vive Cosmos is that it is pursued from the inside out. With six cameras on the headset you can track your movements without the need for external sensors. That worked quite well when I tried different applications. In <em> Museum of Other Realities </em>in which I interacted with several exhibits of a virtual art museum, I was able to immerse myself in sculptures and move my head and body without any significant restrictions. Likewise, in a dance-rhythm game called <em> Audio Trip </em>I was able to move my hands and arms to the beat with barely any delay. The position of my hands and feet could be determined exactly. </p>
<p>  In addition, the Cosmos has a new set of 6-Dof controllers (six degrees of freedom) designed for use with inside-out tracking. Instead of magic wands, they resemble the controls on the Oculus Rift with the circular sensor loops, albeit with a slightly different configuration: the buttons are inside the loop rather than over the loop. Each controller has a grip button, some shutter buttons, and now analog joysticks (which have replaced the touchpads). HTC also included A, B, X, and Y buttons, which should be familiar to anyone who has an Xbox controller. </p><div><script async src=

  HTC Vive Cosmos "data-caption =" HTC Vive Cosmos "data-credit =" Nicole Lee / Engadget "data-credit-link-back =" "data-dam-provider =" "data-local-id = "local-1-7611873-1568248616716" data-media-id = "7eb3393c-9f5a-4f35-8c7b-102b7c6cf828" data-original-url = "https://s.yimg.com/os/creatr-uploaded-images / 2019-09 / 5cccc330-d4f5-11e9-bbee-3575365dbd80 "data-title =" HTC Vive Cosmos "src =" https://o.aolcdn.com/images/dims?crop=1600%2C900%2C0%2C0&quality = 85 & format = jpg & resize = 1600% 2C900 & image_uri = https% 3A% 2F% 2Fs.yimg.com% 2Fos% 2Fcreatr-uploaded -images% 2F519-09% 2F5cccc330-d4f5-11e9-bbee-3575365dbd80 & client = a1acac3e1b3290917d92 & signature = 5c733288b1cceae36e92be79758039ab203774e1 "/> </p>
<p>  At a time when the heads of the other VOSModie also release faceplates that provide extra features.On the launch, HTC will release the Vive Cosm os external tracking mod faceplate that allows you to use the Vive Cosmos with the lighthouse base stations from HTC ve can apply. The Cosmos in itself only provides a 310 degree tracking of the room (which is still pretty good), but with the external tracking front panel and additional sensors you can get a 360 degree tracking of the room. This mod also supports Vive's peripheral ecosystem like the Vive Tracker. It will be available from next year. </p>
<p>  Apart from the hardware, the other big thing about the Cosmos is that it's the first HTC VR headset that ships with the Vive Reality system, not SteamVR. The Vive Reality System is a new piece of software for the platform, delivered with a redesigned user interface called Lens for browsing apps and settings. </p>
<p style=  HTC Vive Cosmos "data-caption =" HTC Vive Cosmos "data-credit =" Nicole Lee / Engadget "data-credit-link-back =" "data-dam-provider =" "data-local-id = "local-3-5102427-1568245926110" data-media-id = "14e534e2-c66c-4436- 8c78-a94453a662d3" data-original-url = "https://s.yimg.com/os/creatr-uploaded-images / 2019-09 / 1dce91a0-d4ef-11e9-8d19-2ae9abd9cdf8 "data-title =" HTC Vive Cosmos "src =" https://o.aolcdn.com/images/dims?crop=1600%2C900%2C0%2C0&quality = 85 & format = jpg & resize = 1600% 2C900 & image_uri = https% 3A% 2F% 2Fs.yimg.com% 2Fos% 2Fcreatr-uploaded-images% 2F1dce91a0-d4ef-11e9-8d19-2ae9abd9cdf8 & client = a1acac3e1b3290917d92 & signature = 7ebe63d8152a6dc34f2be70c56d64f181635 & start When you start the Cosmos for the first time, the source area is opened in a tutorial mode. A HTC spokesman said that this is especially useful for those who do not know VR yet and want to familiarize themselves with different apps and experiences. For example, playing around in Origins taught me how to teleport to different locations, drive a remote-controlled car, and change the virtual environment. </p>
<p>  Even with the best hardware and software in the world, a VR headset is of no importance content. For this reason, HTC has decided to complete a trial subscription to Viveport Infinity, HTC's unlimited games service, along with the headset. The subscription usually costs about $ 12.99 per month or $ 99 per year. If you pre-order the Cosmos from now through October 3, you will receive a 12-month coupon or a 6-month coupon. Since a VR app can cost anywhere between 10 and 30 US dollars, that's a pretty good deal. </p>
<p>  The Vive Cosmos will be released worldwide on October 3rd, but you can pre-order it today. </p>
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