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What Google Can Learn From adidas After Employee Walkout




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Workers leave Google's Mountain View, California, head office on Thursday, November 1

, 2018 in protest. (AP Photo / Noah Berger)

If you At HR, workplace, and future-of-work conferences as likely to be present as me, you would not have noticed that Google has spawned more than any other organization in the last decade, as Bock's book reported on good practice. Working Rules !: Insights from Google that will change your life and leadership has been a global leitmotiv for HR managers and human resource managers to recreate the culture and talent practices of the Silicon Valley giant.

So it was all the more shocking When, on November 1, 2018, thousands of Google employees decided to hold a walk-out in over 40 offices worldwide, protesting how the company sexually maladministration handled or not complaints about his workplace culture.

Claire Stapl Eton, one of the organizers of the walkout, a product marketing manager on Google on YouTube, told the New York Times: "Google is famous for its culture. But in fact, we do not even meet the basics of respect, justice and fairness for each one of us. "The seven organizers of the protest also made a number of demands on the company's leadership that are equivalent to wages and opportunities for all, more transparency in dealing with complaints of any kind about gender bias, sexual misconduct and harassment.

What is special about the strike is that many men have joined the women in their protest Singapore to Japan, from Ireland to the various offices in the United States.

Some eyebrows were raised in 2017, when Google introduced a new benefit to Apple and Facebook that offered oocyte cryopreservation to emale employees. or egg freeze. The benefit should allow female employees to postpone family planning, perhaps even beyond their natural fertile years, and to convey the message that work is more important than family life. This advantage has further perpetuated the broken system, which simply does not take into account that employees have a life out of work that they want to spend as meaningfully as possible, with family, friends, activism, themselves, and their loved ones. This mentality was made famous by Marissa Mayer, who brought back 130-hour weeks when she was at Google, regularly tugging All-Nighters, claiming that this was the only way to succeed.

The Google leadership supported the strike – after all, this is a very important starting point for feedback that is essential as a software and technology company for improvement. It also shows that dissatisfaction with Google's campus has been bubbling for a while and that, despite the many benefits and benefits and sheer prestige of working for Google, it's not enough to make employees happy and involved.

So, next Google? My advice would be to look at other sectors and other companies, break out of Silicon Valley's echo chamber, and peek behind the scenes of some of the most successful companies . Life integration, gender equality and well-being of employees, such as adidas, based in Herzogenaurach, Germany.

You've already implemented one of Google's claims. Google employees call for the appointment of the Chief Diversity Officer, who reports directly to the CEO and makes recommendations to the Board. adidas has found a way to do so by appointing Karen Parkin, Chief HR Officer, to the company's Executive Board, whose direct report is the Global Director for Diversity and Work-Life Integration, that issues of diversity and working life be on the agenda of the Governing Board meetings.

What does this warning story tell us about Google? That the world has become a tiny place because of the internet and social media, and we all have a ticket to what until recently was well hidden in the boardrooms and corner offices of the company. Can we expect more employees in other companies to follow suit? We can do that for sure!

Today's employees have a voice, and they will express what they want for their talent and hard work. They want organizations to be responsible, decision-making processes are transparent, and leadership is trustworthy. They want a culture that not only celebrates the type and willingness to sacrifice of the ideal worker, but also values ​​employees as whole people, normalizes parenting and caring responsibilities, and allows their employees to live a happy and fulfilling life outside of their jobs and careers.

That's it It's definitely time to close the gap in the fruit bowl – reality, which makes a difference to employees, is often different from what executives think their employees need or want , Be sure to keep the yoga and ping pong table and panini, but think deeper, think easier. Paid parental leave, childcare support, psychiatric care, regular breaks – these are the new distinguishing features of amazing corporate cultures. And if you want to figure out what adidas is doing, there's a new book that describes just that: One Life – how forward-thinking organizations use work-life integration to attract (and retain) talent and well-being Employees promote

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Workers leave Google's Mountain View, California, on Thursday, November 1, 2018, in protest. (AP Photo / Noah Berger)

If you're just as likely to attend HR, Workplace, and Future of Work Conferences As I am, you have not realized that Google has more than any other organization in the last decade when speakers cited good practice. "Laszlo Bock's book, Work Rules!: Insights from Google that will change your life and leadership has been a leitmotif for human resource managers and human resource managers worldwide to recreate the culture and talent practices of Silicon Valley.

It was all the more shocking November 1, 2018 Thousands of Google employees opted for 19659003 in more than forty offices worldwide in protest of how the company handled – or better said – did not handle sexual misconduct and complaints about its workplace culture.

Claire Stapleton, one of the organizers of walkout, a product marketing manager on Google on YouTube, told the New York Times, "Google is famous for its culture. But in fact, we do not even meet the basics of respect, justice and fairness for each one of us. "The seven organizers of the protest also made a number of demands on the company's leadership that are equivalent to wages and opportunities for all, more transparency in dealing with complaints of any kind about gender bias, sexual misconduct and harassment.

What is special about this strike is that many men have joined the women in their protest Singapore to Japan, from Ireland to the various offices in the United States.

Some eyebrows were raised in 2017, when Google introduced a new benefit to Apple and Facebook that offered oocyte cryopreservation to emale employees. or egg freeze. The benefit should allow female employees to postpone family planning, perhaps even beyond their natural fertile years, and to convey the message that work is more important than family life. This advantage has further perpetuated the broken system, which simply does not take into account that employees have a life out of work that they want to spend as meaningfully as possible, with family, friends, activism, themselves, and their loved ones. This mentality was made famous by Marissa Mayer, who brought back 130-hour weeks when she was at Google, regularly tugging All-Nighters, claiming that this was the only way to succeed.

The Google leadership supported the strike – after all, this is a very important starting point for feedback that is essential as a software and technology company for improvement. It also shows that dissatisfaction with Google's campus has been bubbling for a while, and that, despite many perks and benefits and the sheer prestige of working for Google, it's not enough to make employees happy and involved.

I suggest you take a look at other industries and other companies, break out of Silicon Valley's echo chamber, and peek behind the scenes of some of the most successful companies In terms of work-life integration, gender equality and employee well-being, as at adidas, based in Herzogenaurach, Germany.

You've already implemented one of Google's claims. Google employees call for the appointment of the Chief Diversity Officer, who reports directly to the CEO and makes recommendations to the Board. adidas has found a way to do so by appointing Karen Parkin, Chief HR Officer, to the company's Executive Board, whose direct report is the Global Director for Diversity and Work-Life Integration, that issues of diversity and working life be on the agenda of the Governing Board meetings.

What does this warning story tell us about Google? That the world has become a tiny place because of the internet and social media, and we all have a ticket to what until recently was well hidden in the boardrooms and corner offices of the company. Can we expect more employees in other companies to follow suit? We can do that for sure!

Today's employees have a voice, and they will express what they want for their talent and hard work. They want organizations to be responsible, decision-making processes are transparent, and leadership is trustworthy. They want a culture that not only celebrates the type and willingness to sacrifice of the ideal worker, but also appreciates the employees as whole people, normalizes parenting and caring responsibilities, and allows their employees a happy and fulfilling life outside their work and career. It is definite time to close the gap in the fruit bowl – the reality of what makes a difference to employees is often different from what executives think their employees need or want. Be sure to keep the yoga and ping pong table and panini, but think deeper, think easier. Paid parental leave, childcare support, psychiatric care, regular breaks – these are the new distinguishing features of amazing corporate cultures. And if you want to figure out what adidas is doing, there's a new book that describes just that: One Life – how forward-thinking organizations use work-life integration to attract (and retain) talent and well-being To encourage employees


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