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Would an extraterrestrial civilization consider the earth as an & # 39; interesting & # 39; Classify planets?




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Everywhere in the universe you can see trillions of galaxies, each of which typically contains billions and millions of stars, here on Earth Not only does life come to life, thriving and becoming complex and differentiated, but to some degree intelligent, technologically advanced and even space-efficient, but these recent advances – taking us into space and information The civilization has seen us, would we in their view even seem interesting ?, asked Tayte Taliaferro It is to know and ask:

I thought about the projection of light through space to. My curtain was open and I saw the stars and something from a book in my head. It had said that the stars we see are basically repetitions. The light has been so long that we do not even know if the star still exists or not.

[…] What signals we send out or what changes can be observed on our planet to prove that intelligent life rules here would take billions of years to achieve something alive and responsive! What do you think?

I think these are great questions to think about, and science has a lot to say about what extraterrestrials would see when they look at the Earth.

In our solar system, the Earth is a rocky planet with a thin atmosphere that orbits our Sun in what we call habitable. Zone: At a distance, in the liquid Water in a terrestrial atmosphere may be stable on the planetary surface. Mars and Venus may also be in this region of space, but Venus is currently too hot and Mars too cold (and too thin an atmosphere) for Earth-like life to thrive there.

Two of the most prolific ways to find planets outside the solar system are:

  1. The star-shaking method, where a orbiting planet pulls on its parent star to oscillate it along the viewer's line of sight, allowing scientists to this determines the period and mass of the planet (to the uncertainty of its orbit orientation) and
  2. the transit method in which a rotating planet wanders over the face of its parent star from the perspective of an external observer and periodically causes the parent star to darken because the disc of the planet blocks part of the star's light.

This is a solid way to search for potentially inhabited worlds, but only works for planets randomly oriented toward their parent star from the perspective of an external, distant observer. For example, future observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope or the 30-meter groundscopes currently under construction plan to investigate the nearest transit worlds for potential biosignatures.

However, we will most certainly miss most of the inhabited worlds if the transit technique is the only one we use. If the orientation deviates by a tiny amount – a fraction of a degree for a planet like Earth – transit will just not happen, and we have no way to examine its atmospheric content. But all hope is not lost, because there is another technique that is not based on a happy alignment and that could be brought within reach with foreseeable technological improvements: the direct imaging of the newly discovered Planet Fomalhaut b orbits . [+] his mother star. This is the first time a planet has been observed with visible light outside the solar system. In direct imaging, however, further progress will be needed to expose an exomoon or advanced signatures attributable to intelligent extraterrestrials.


NASA, ESA, P. Kalas, J. Graham, E. Chiang and E. Kite (University of California, Berkeley), M. Clampin (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD), M. Fitzgerald (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA) and K. Stapelfeldt and J. Krist (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

Thanks to the power of the Hubble Space Telescope (and later the ground-based adaptive optics) we already have The first direct images of exoplanets were taken and they can actively circle their parent stars. By using instruments such as a coronagraph or a star shadow, we can block the light of the parent star in the orbits of the potentially inhabited planet and instead only map the planet of interest.

From just one pixel, when we're ready to wait If we observe the distant world over long distances, we can not only determine if it is inhabited or not, but we can also look for some of the most striking features we have to find on earth. By taking a direct image of a planet and quantifying the different wavelengths of light that arrive at different times, we can learn a very long list of properties.

Using short-term changes and recurrent spectroscopic signatures, we can determine the orbital period of the planet.

Using the colors of the planet, we can determine how much of the world is covered with water versus land versus ice, and recognize the presence of clouds when they exist.

In the course of a year (where the planet makes a complete revolution around its parent star) we could determine:

  • its orbit properties (from the phases)),
  • whether the landmasses turn green again over the seasons become brown and green (due to photometric observations),
  • and with sufficiently advanced technology could even detect whether artificial light of any kind is unexpectedly lit. t The night side of the planet.

For an observer less than 100 light-years away, artificial light would be visible to a telescope large enough to view this type of low light is optimized. It's an amazing feat of technology that humans have conquered the darkness of the night with artificial light, but there is a price: the loss of natural darkness that plants, animals and other living things have become accustomed to in billions of years of evolution. 19659019] However, there is an advantage that we do not often consider: the fact that we have changed the natural appearance of our planet means that a sufficiently intelligent alien species observing us will conclude the existence of a planet-changing species can. It's not a slam dunk, but such a signature is a strong indication that the planet is not just inhabited, but inhabited by an intelligent, technologically advanced species.

Without a second As an example of life in the universe, we can only speculate on how probable life is on a potentially habitable planet. There could be billions of other worlds in the galaxy that are currently living, or Earth could be the only one. There could be a complex life that lasts for hundreds of millions or billions of years on a variety of planets in the Milky Way, or it could be the Earth.

And finally, there could be thousands of extraterrestrial astronaut species in our galaxy, or humans could be the most advanced creatures in the entire visible universe. Until we find a second life example to know that we are not alone, we can only speculate and set boundaries that are not out there.

The same signals that we expect from other civilizations – atmospheric signatures, surface features that evolve in a certain way, satellites and spacecraft, even deliberate and information-rich signals like FM radio waves – make ours own civilization by equally (or more) recognizable. advanced aliens. Even from a great distance an inhabited earth would be identifiable, but an earth inhabited by technologically advanced beings will only be detectable for those civilizations that are close enough to see us in our recent state.

Even though the majority of galaxies in the universe are many billions of light-years away, millions and millions of stars are located within a few hundred light-years from Earth. That means millions of planets, millions of life chances and even millions of opportunities for intelligent aliens. If even such a nearby world turns out to be inhabited, even the great cosmic distances will not stop us from finding out about them, just as they will be more than capable of finding out about us.

The speed of light may be a limiting factor, but in time the influence of humans becomes visible to anyone who is in one of more than 60 billion galaxies. It may not be the fastest conversation, but even finding extraterrestrial life once would change our idea of ​​existence forever. I can not wait to find out!


Send your Ask Ethan questions to startswithabang at gmail dot com!

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Everywhere in the universe, billions of galaxies can be seen, each containing billions and billions of stars, and here on Earth, not only did life emerge, thrive, and become complex and differentiated, but also to some extent also intelligent, technologically advanced and even space suitable The space and information age is extremely new and space huge, if a strange civilization has seen us, we would go out do you think they are interesting? Tayte Taliaferro wants to know and asks:

I was thinking about the projection of light through space. My curtain was open and I saw the stars and something from a book in my head. It had said that the stars we see are basically repetitions. The light has been so long that we do not even know if the star still exists or not.

[…] What signals we send out or what changes can be observed on our planet to prove that intelligent life rules here would take billions of years to achieve something alive and responsive! What do you think?

I think those are great questions to think about, and science has a lot to say about what extraterrestrials would see when they look at Earth.

In our solar system, the Earth is a rocky planet with a thin atmosphere that orbits our Sun in what we call habitable. Zone: At a distance, in the liquid Water in a terrestrial atmosphere may be stable on the planetary surface. Mars and Venus may also be in this region of space, but Venus is currently too hot and Mars too cold (and too thin an atmosphere) for Earth-like life to thrive there.

Two of the most productive methods of finding planets outside the solar system are:

  1. The star-shaking method, where a orbiting planet pulls on its parent star to oscillate it along the viewer's line of sight, allowing scientists to this determines the period and mass of the planet (to the uncertainty of its orbit orientation) and
  2. the transit method in which a rotating planet wanders over the face of its parent star from the perspective of an external observer and periodically causes the parent star to darken because the disc of the planet blocks part of the star's light.

This is a solid way to search for potentially inhabited worlds, but only works for planets randomly oriented toward their parent star from the perspective of an external, distant observer. For example, future observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope or the 30-meter groundscopes currently under construction plan to investigate the nearest transit worlds for potential biosignatures.

However, we will most certainly miss most of the inhabited worlds if the transit technique is the only one we use. If the orientation deviates by a tiny amount – a fraction of a degree for a planet like Earth – transit will just not happen, and we have no way to examine its atmospheric content. But all hope is not lost, because there is another technique that is not based on a happy alignment and could be brought within reach with foreseeable technological improvements: the direct imaging.

Dank der Kraft des Hubble-Weltraumteleskops (und später der bodengestützten adaptiven Optik) haben wir bereits erste direkte Bilder von Exoplaneten aufgenommen und diese sogar aktiv umkreisen können ihre Elternstars. Durch die Verwendung von Instrumenten wie einem Koronagraph oder einem Sternenschatten können wir das Licht des übergeordneten Sterns auf den Umlaufbahnen des möglicherweise bewohnten Planeten blockieren und stattdessen nur den interessierenden Planeten abbilden.

Von nur einem Pixel, wenn wir bereit sind zu warten Wenn wir die ferne Welt über weite Strecken beobachten, können wir nicht nur feststellen, ob sie bewohnt ist oder nicht, sondern wir können auch nach einigen der auffälligsten Merkmale suchen, die wir auf der Erde finden. Indem wir ein direktes Bild eines Planeten aufnehmen und die verschiedenen Wellenlängen des Lichts quantifizieren, die zu verschiedenen Zeiten eintreffen, können wir eine sehr lange Liste von Eigenschaften lernen.

Anhand von kurzfristigen Änderungen und wiederkehrenden spektroskopischen Signaturen können wir die Umlaufzeit des Planeten bestimmen.

Anhand der Farben des Planeten können wir bestimmen, wie viel von der Welt mit Wasser im Vergleich zu Land bedeckt ist versus Eis, und erkennen Sie das Vorhandensein von Wolken, wenn sie existieren.

Im Laufe eines Jahres (wo der Planet eine vollständige Umdrehung um seinen Mutterstern vollzieht) konnten wir bestimmen:

  • seine Umlaufbahn-Eigenschaften (aus den Phasen) ),
  • ob die Landmassen im Laufe der Jahreszeiten wieder grün und braun und grün werden (aufgrund photometrischer Beobachtungen),
  • und mit ausreichend fortschrittlicher Technologie sogar feststellen könnten, ob künstliches Licht jeglicher Art unerwartet beleuchtet ist t Die Nachtseite des Planeten.

Für einen Beobachter, der sich in weniger als 100 Lichtjahren Entfernung befindet, wäre künstliches Licht für ein Teleskop sichtbar, das groß genug und für die Betrachtung dieser Art von schwachem Licht optimiert ist. Es ist eine erstaunliche Leistung der Technologie, dass Menschen die Dunkelheit der Nacht durch künstliches Licht erobert haben, aber es gibt einen Preis: den Verlust der natürlichen Dunkelheit, an die sich Pflanzen, Tiere und andere Lebewesen in Milliarden von Jahren der Evolution gewöhnt haben. 19659019] Es gibt jedoch einen Vorteil, den wir nicht oft in Betracht ziehen: Die Tatsache, dass wir das natürliche Erscheinungsbild unseres Planeten verändert haben, bedeutet, dass eine ausreichend intelligente gebietsfremde Spezies, die uns beobachtet, auf die Existenz einer Planeten verändernden Spezies schließen kann. Es ist kein Slam Dunk, aber eine solche Signatur ist ein starker Hinweis darauf, dass der Planet nicht nur bewohnt ist, sondern auch von einer intelligenten, technologisch fortschrittlichen Spezies bewohnt wird.

Without a second example of life in the Universe, we can only speculate on what the odds of life arising on a potentially habitable planet are. There could be billions of other worlds in the galaxy with life on them right now, or Earth could be the only one. There could be complex life that sustains itself for hundreds of millions or even billions of years on a plethora of planets in the Milky Way, or Earth could be it.

And finally, there could be thousands of spacefaring alien species in our galaxy, or human beings might be the most advanced creatures in the entire visible Universe. Until we find a second example of life to know that we aren&#39;t alone, all we can do is speculate and impose limits on what isn&#39;t out there.

The same signals that we&#39;re seeking from other civilizations — atmospheric signatures, surface features that evolve in a particular way, satellites and spacecraft, even deliberate and information-rich signals like FM radio waves — make our own civilization detectable by equally (or more) advanced extraterrestrials. From even a great distance away, an inhabited Earth would be identifiable, but an Earth inhabited by technologically advanced beings is only detectable to those civilizations close enough to see us in our recently achieved state.

Even though the majority of galaxies in the Universe are many billions of light-years away, there are millions upon millions of stars located within just a few hundred light-years of Earth. That means millions of planets, millions of chances at life, and even millions of possibilities for intelligent aliens. If even one such nearby world turns out to be inhabited, even the great cosmic distances won&#39;t keep us from finding out about them, just as they&#39;ll be more than capable of finding out about us, too.

The speed of light may be a limiting factor, but with enough time, the impact of human beings will be visible to any being residing in any one of more than 60 billion galaxies. It might not make for the fastest conversation, but finding even one instance of alien life beyond Earth would change our conception of existence forever. I can&#39;t wait for us to find out!


Send in your Ask Ethan questions to startswithabang at gmail dot com!

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