Home / Health / The deadly ZOMBIE deer disease is spreading "rapidly in the US" – and man could be next

The deadly ZOMBIE deer disease is spreading "rapidly in the US" – and man could be next



The deadly infectious ZOMBIE deer spreads "rapidly in the US" – and experts warn that people could contract next

  • Chronic wasting disease currently affects 24 states of deer, moose and moose
  • The infection attacks the brain and spinal cord before death
  • Infected creatures also lose weight dramatically and become very aggressive
  • Michael Osterhold has warned that people may become infected next
  • . A study shows that it can be spread from animals to animals – including primates

Luke Kenton for Dailymail.com

1:27 EST, 17 February 2019

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A fatal and infectious condition known as "zombie deer disease" is expected to spread rapidly in the US – and man could come next, an expert warned.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is currently plaguing deer. Moose and elk in 24 states and two Canadian provinces.

The disease infects the creature's brain, spinal cord, and other tissues before ultimately causing death.

It also leads to dramatic weight loss, loss of coordination and loss of hyperaggression.

  The disease got its nickname from the bizarre symptoms that it causes, including a blank look and exposed ribs as the animal wastes physically (Photo: a CWD-affected roe deer)

  The disease has its nickname from the bizarre symptoms that caused them. These include an empty look and exposed ribs, as the animal is physically wasted thereby (Photo: a deer suffering from CWD)

The disease got its nickname from the bizarre symptoms it causes a blank look and exposed ribs, as the Animal is physically wasted (Picture: a deer suffering from CWD)

WHAT IS "ZOMBIE DEER-DISEASE"?

As of January 2019, 24 US states and two Canadian provinces have reported chronic wasting disease (CWD), also known as "zombie deer disease".

Infection infests the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, moose, and elk, leading to dramatic weight loss, lack of coordination, and even aggression before eventually dying.

There are still no signs that it can infect humans, and no such cases have been reported to the CDC.

But a recent study found that macaques could get the disease after they consumed infected meat, and there is a fear that a variant that also attacks humans could potentially pose potential risks ,

Michael Osterhold, director of the Center for Infection Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, warned this week about possible implications for state legislators.

"It is likely that humans are cases of chronic waste associated with the consumption of contaminated meat will be documented in the coming years. & # 39; 19659011: & # 39; It is possible that the number of cases in humans is considerable and not isolated. & # 39;

Osterhold Over 150 people were killed compared to CWD with the Mad Cow Disease, which took place across the UK in the 1980s and 1990s.

CWD was spotted for the first time in the wild about 40 years ago, but was seen as a Fa in captive deer. In the late 1960s, there were none.

There are no documented cases in which people have CWD, but recent research shows that they can be transmitted to other animals – including primates.

  Michael Oldster (above), director of the Center for Infectious Diseases Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, warned of possible human effects

  Michael Oldster (top), director of the Center for Infectious Disease Infection Research and Policy The University of Minnesota, warned of potential hazards impact on humans

Michael Oldster (above), director of the Center for Infection Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, warned of potential human effects

  According to the CDC The disease has now been reported in at least 24 states in the continental United States and two Canadian provinces, two countries since last year. Disease reporting areas are shown in red

  According to the CDC, the disease has now been reported in at least 24 states in the continental United States and in two Canadian provinces, two states since last year. Disease reporting areas are shown in red

According to the CDC, the disease has now been reported in at least 24 states in the continental United States and in two Canadian provinces, two states since last year. Areas with reports of the disease are shown in red

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), contaminated meat is most likely to be consumed – similar to Mad Cow disease.

Currently up to 15,000 infected deer are eaten each year – a figure that Osterhold expects to increase by 20 percent a year.

Asked about the odds of CWD infection in humans, Osterhold compared it to a litter on The Genetic Roulette Table.

So far, the CWD has developed mainly in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming, and has continued to expand ever since.

  Formally referred to as a chronic wasteful disease, the disease infects the brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk, and elk.

  Formally referred to as a chronic-eating disease, the disease infects brain, spinal cord, and other tissues in deer, elk and moose

Formally chronic wasting disease, the Illne ss attacks the brain, spinal cord and other tissues in deer, elk and moose

  It eventually leads to death (Image: a depleted deer that died of CWD)

  It eventually leads to death (Picture: An Emaciated Deer, who died of CWD)

He eventually leads to death (Figure: an emaciated deer who died of CWD)

"Since the year 2000 For example, the area that is known to be CWD affected by wildlife has risen to at least 24 states, including Midwestern, Southwestern and Limited states Areas on the east coast, says the CDC.

"It is possible that CWD also occurs in other states without strong animal monitoring systems. Cases have not yet been discovered.

"Once CWD has established itself in an area, the risk can remain in the environment for a long time. The affected areas are likely to continue to expand.

The nickname owes its nickname to the bizarre symptoms it causes, including a blank look and exposed ribs, as it physically wastes the animal.

"People need to understand the meaning of this. We can not wait until the first cases come, "said Osterholm.

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